Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good evening!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 14 - Are You Constantly Hearing about the Weather in English?
Braden: Hello, and welcome to EnglishClass101.com, where we study modern English in a fun educational format.
Natalie: So brush up on the English that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us in this lesson. Natalie, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Natalie: In this lesson, you'll learn about using adverbs in sentences.
Braden: This conversation takes place on the plane during the shift.
Natalie: And it’s between Jessica and David.
Braden: After the ice-breaker in Denver, Jessica and David became friends and are now speaking casually.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Jessica: Wow! I've heard that sunny days don't happen in Seattle!
David: Yeah, sunlight is cherished around here.
Jessica: Are you speaking from experience?
David: Yeah. I lived in Seattle for a few years while I went to school. Great city but the weather can wear on you.
Jessica: My friend told me that in Seattle, there are often months of rain.
David: Yeah. It isn't hard rain though. The weather just drizzles constantly, day after day.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jessica: Wow! I've heard that sunny days don't happen in Seattle!
David: Yeah, sunlight is cherished around here.
Jessica: Are you speaking from experience?
David: Yeah. I lived in Seattle for a few years while I went to school. Great city but the weather can wear on you.
Jessica: My friend told me that in Seattle, there are often months of rain.
David: Yeah. It isn't hard rain though. The weather just drizzles constantly, day after day.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, in this lesson you'll learn a bit about Seattle.
Natalie: That's right. Seattle is the largest city in the Pacific Northwest with 600,000 residents. Beyond that, the Seattle metropolitan area has over 3.4 million inhabitants and is the 15th largest metropolitan area in the United States.
Braden: Seattle is interesting because it's a major coastal seaport for the United States with China and Japan. Seattle is the 6th busiest port in the United States.
Natalie: An interesting fact about the city is that it is well known for being a cloudy city. It also has one of the highest precipitation rates in the United States. On average, the Seattle climate is cloudy 200 days of the year and partly cloudy 93 days of the year.
Braden: So that's like over 80% of the time, it's cloudy in Seattle.
Natalie: Pretty much. Also, as of 2010, Seattle was the 12th largest metropolitan economy in the United States and is home to several multibillion dollar companies including Amazon.com, Starbucks, Costco, and Microsoft.
Natalie: Seattle is also far above the national average for education levels in the United States. Almost 92% of the population has a high school diploma and over 50% has a bachelors degree or higher.
Braden: If I remember right, Seattle was listed as the most literate large city in the United States in 2008, tied with Minneapolis.
Natalie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we shall see is...
Natalie: sunny [natural native speed]
Braden: weather full of sun; bright in appearance or manner
Natalie: sunny [slowly - broken down by syllable] sunny [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: days [natural native speed]
Braden: periods of twenty four hours
Natalie: days [slowly - broken down by syllable] days [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: happen [natural native speed]
Braden: take place; occur
Natalie: happen [slowly - broken down by syllable] happen [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: cherished [natural native speed]
Braden: protected and cared for lovingly
Natalie: cherished [slowly - broken down by syllable] cherished [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: around [natural native speed]
Braden: situated on every side
Natalie: around [slowly - broken down by syllable] around [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: constant [natural native speed]
Braden: continuing without any variation or change
Natalie: constant [slowly - broken down by syllable] constant [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: drizzle [natural native speed]
Braden: light rain falling in very fine drops
Natalie: drizzle [slowly - broken down by syllable] drizzle [natural native speed]
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the word “cherished.”
Braden: The word “cherished” is a special word in English. The dictionary defines “cherish” as “protect and care for lovingly.”
Natalie: To cherish something means that you hold it dear to you or that you keep it in one's mind often. People often cherish memories of when they were happy as children.
Braden: Now our tip here is that the word “cherished” has a lot of meaning. It comes from the middle English word that means “treat with affection.”
Natalie: So in the dialogue when David uses the word “cherished” he's trying to be funny by using such an intense word but also truthful.
Braden: He could have also said, “Sunlight is such a rare thing in the Seattle area but it is greatly appreciated.” Could you break down the word "cherished" for us?
Natalie: (slowly) cherished
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) cherished
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “day after day.”
Braden: This phrase gives the feeling of something that constantly happened. It doesn't stop.
Natalie: Yeah. Every day, it always happens, day after day.
Braden: This is an English idiom and is used often. This particular idiom doesn't have a formality level so it is appropriate both in professional situations as well as casual situations.
Natalie: There are some variations such as – month after month, year after year, or hour after hour.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) day after day
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) day after day
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is adverbs.
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase...
Natalie: The weather just drizzles constantly, day after day.
Braden: Okay so, Adverbs are words that describe verbs. For example, the words quickly, badly, or warmly are all adverbs.
Natalie: English is full of adverbs and in this lesson we'll talk about 3 different adverbs and how to use them.
Braden: Adverbs are special because they “add” meaning to the "verb." That's why we call them “add+verbs" or “adverbs.”
Natalie: Let's look at 3 different adverbs; the adverb “happily,” “constantly,” and “slowly.” Generally, adverbs end in "-ly."
Braden: Our first word is "Happily." “Happily” means that the action was done in a happy way or a happy manner. For example –
Natalie: “Joseph smiles happily.”
Braden: Here, the adverb “happily” describes the way Joseph smiles. Another example would be –
Natalie: “The bride laughs happily.”
Braden: Here, “happily” describes the way the bride laughs.
Natalie: Remember, adverbs describe action not nouns so “happily” describes the bride's laugh, not the bride herself.
Braden: Next let’s look at the adverb “constantly.”
Natalie: Constantly means that the action was done in a constant way or a constant manner. For example –
Braden: “Julie sings constantly.”
Natalie: Here, the adverb “constantly” describes the way that Julie sings.
Braden: Last, let's look at the adverb “slowly.”
Natalie: “Slowly” means that the action was done in a slow way or in a slow manner. For example –
Braden: “Christian drives the car slowly.”
Natalie: Here, the way that Christian drives is described by the adverb “slowly.”
Braden: Again remember, that the action “Christian drives” is described by “slowly.” Not Christian himself.
Natalie: Another example would be – “The bird glides slowly.”
Braden: Here, the way that the bird “glides” is described as “slowly.”
Natalie: To “glide” means to move with a smooth continuous motion and describes the way the bird is flying.
Braden: Should we review this lesson?
Natalie: Let's!
Braden: Adverbs are special words that describe verbs, not nouns. English is full of adverbs.
Natalie: The reason adverbs are “special” is because they add meaning to verbs. That's why we call them “add-verbs.”
Braden: You can usually identify adverbs by their "-ly" endings.

Outro

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Hello EnglishClass101.com listeners! Many people say that Seattle is a great place. Have any of you ever visited Seattle?