Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good morning!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 16 - Easily Turn Adverbs into Adjectives in English!
Braden: Hello, and welcome to the EnglishClass101.com, the fastest, easiest, and the most fun way to learn English. I’m joined here in the studio by...
Natalie: Natalie. Hello, everyone!
Braden: In this lesson, you'll learn about making adverbs and adjectives.
Natalie: This conversation takes place at the baggage claim in Atlanta.
Braden: And it’s between an old lady and Michael.
Natalie: Michael is helping a passenger in the baggage claim. He is speaking respectfully.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Old Lady: Excuse me, young man. Could you help me?
Michael: What seems to be the problem?
Old Lady: I can't find my luggage.
Michael: What's your flight number, ma'am?
Old Lady: 3995.
Michael: According to what's on the screen, your luggage will come out on conveyor belt number four which is in the other room. You'll have to go there to get your luggage.
Old Lady: Oh thank you! This is my first time flying to Atlanta and I'm a bit lost.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Old Lady: Excuse me, young man. Could you help me?
Michael: What seems to be the problem?
Old Lady: I can't find my luggage.
Michael: What's your flight number, ma'am?
Old Lady: 3995.
Michael: According to what's on the screen, your luggage will come out on conveyor belt number four which is in the other room. You'll have to go there to get your luggage.
Old Lady: Oh thank you! This is my first time flying to Atlanta and I'm a bit lost.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Atlanta.
Natalie: Right. Atlanta is the capital and largest city in the state of Georgia with a population of 420,000.
Braden: Atlanta is also the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area which is home to 5.3 million people.
Natalie: It's the 9th largest metropolitan area in the United States.
Braden: That's right. And Atlanta is also home to the world's busiest airport, the Atlanta International airport.
Natalie: Atlanta has a gross metropolitan product of $270 billion annually which ranks it as the 6th largest in the United States. The city is the center for services, finances, information technology, government, and higher education.
Braden: Atlanta contains the countries 3rd largest concentration of Fortune 500 companies, and world headquarters for the Coca-Cola Company, Turner Broadcasting, Home Depot, AT&T, UPS, and Delta Airlines. Over 35 million people visit Atlanta every year.
Natalie: A few curiosities about Atlanta are that the Atlanta Braves, a professional baseball team, is the oldest, continuously-operating professional sports franchise in the United States and that Atlanta was also the home of Dr. Martin Luther King, a world leader in civil rights.
Braden: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we shall see is...
Natalie: ma'am [natural native speed]
Braden: polite way to address a woman
Natalie: ma'am [slowly - broken down by syllable] ma'am [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: luggage [natural native speed]
Braden: suitcases and bags for traveling
Natalie: luggage [slowly - broken down by syllable] luggage [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: flight [natural native speed]
Braden: act of flying
Natalie: flight [slowly - broken down by syllable] flight [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: number [natural native speed]
Braden: symbol representing a quantity
Natalie: number [slowly - broken down by syllable] number [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: screen [natural native speed]
Braden: a fixed or movable upright partition used to divide a room
Natalie: screen [slowly - broken down by syllable] screen [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: conveyor [natural native speed]
Braden: thing that transports or communicates something
Natalie: conveyor [slowly - broken down by syllable] conveyor [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: belt [natural native speed]
Braden: strip of material used for transferring motion from one wheel to another
Natalie: belt [slowly - broken down by syllable] belt [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: lost [natural native speed]
Braden: unable to find one’s way
Natalie: lost [slowly - broken down by syllable] lost [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: The first word/phrase we’ll look at is....
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the word “ma’am.”
Braden: Okay so, the word “ma'am” is a term of respectful or polite address. The key here is that it is only used for women. You'll never call a man “ma'am.”
Natalie: That's right. This is also the technical title for a ranking female officer in the police or military. Usually, the term “ma'am” is reserved for people much older than you or people who are significantly above you socially.
Braden: For example, in Great Britain, "ma'am" is the correct title for a female member of royalty. So you'd say "Yes, ma'am." to the Queen of England.
Natalie: If your boss is a woman you should probably call her "ma'am" but if she is the ranking CEO in the company and you are her secretary, you most definitely should refer to her as “ma'am.”
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) ma’am
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) ma’am
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “flight number.”
Braden: Okay so a “flight number” is a special number used to identify a particular plane flight. The plane you will be flying on during your trip will have its own "flight number."
Natalie: When you're traveling, this number is all-important. Using this number you can find where your flight is, which gate your plane is at, if your plane is late, and many other things.
Braden: Our tip here is to have this number memorized when you travel.
Natalie: This is because the people who work at airports tend to be very busy. So they will say "flight number" very quickly and in a number of different ways. For example, an airport worker might ask you, “What's your flight?” or "What's the number?"
Braden: Or they might say, “What flight are you on?” They may even be very direct and say, “Flight number, please.” The correct response to these questions is the same, it's your "flight number."
Natalie: So if you want your trip to come off without a hitch, practice hearing and speaking this word often and memorize it so you can give it to the Airport workers quickly.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) flight number
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) flight number
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is making adverbs and adjectives.
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: Your luggage will come out on conveyor belt number four.
Braden: Okay so, adjectives describe nouns and adverbs describe verbs. In English, adverbs are usually made from adjectives.
Natalie: There are 2 rules to follow in regard to making adverbs from adjectives.
Braden: That's right. The first rule is that when the adjective ends in the letter “Y” then you change the “y” to an “I” and then add the "-ly" ending.
Natalie: One example of this would be – “Heavy” which becomes “heavily” spelled “h-e-a-v-i-l-y"
Braden: Another example would be “Happy” which becomes “happily” spelled “h-a-p-p-i-l-y”
Natalie: The second rule is that when the adjective ends in anything but the letter “Y,” then you just add an “-ly.”
Braden: One example is – “Warm” which becomes “warmly” spelled “w-a-r-m-l-y"
Natalie: Another example would be “Nice” which becomes “nicely” spelled “n-i-c-e-l-y”
Braden: There are three exceptions to these rules. The words “early,” “fast,” and “hard.”
Natalie: With each of these words the adjective form and the adverb form are the same.
Braden: For example, The adjective form of “early” could be used like this – “He is an early riser.”
Natalie: Here, "early" is used as an adjective to describe the noun "riser.”
Braden: In the adverb form, “early" would look like this – “He wakes up early.”
Natalie: Here, “early” is used as an adverb to describe the action of waking up. The same pattern holds true for “fast” and “hard.”
Braden: Our last exception is the word “good.” The adverb form of "good" is “well.”
Natalie: For example – “She drives well.”
Braden: Here the adverb “well” describes the way that “she drives.”
Natalie: The phrase, “She drives good.” is incorrect and it's common for grammarians to make fun of you for using "good" as an adverb.
Braden: It's happened to me quite a few times. To avoid that, always use "well" as the adverb and "good" as a noun or adjective.
Natalie: Let's review this lesson.
Braden: Adverbs and adjectives are very similar. They both add meaning to words to make them more specific, more beautiful, or more correct.
Natalie: Adverbs add meaning to the verbs. They describe the action or the way in which the action was performed.
Braden: Adjectives describe nouns or the state the nouns are in.
Natalie: You can change most adjectives into adverbs by simply adding and -ly at the end. However there are some exceptions.
Braden: One of those exceptions is the word "good.” It's adverb form is “well.”

Outro

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Good morning to all and to all a good day! When traveling in an airport you're either helping someone or needing help. Did this lesson help you know how to do that better?

Eugénie
Friday at 12:29 AM
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I like this lesson! thank you :smile: