Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good morning!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 24 - Do You See A Future for Yourself in this American City?
Natalie: Hello, everyone. I’m Natalie. Welcome to EnglishClass101.com!
Braden: With us, you’ll learn to speak English in fun and effective lessons.
Natalie: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Braden: and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Braden: In this lesson, you'll learn about using the future "will."
Natalie: This conversation takes place on the plane during the shift.
Braden: And it’s between David and Jessica.
Natalie: After the ice-breaker in Denver, Jessica and David became friends and are now speaking casually.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
David: So we’ll only be in Los Angeles for about forty-five minutes before we make our last, and longest, leg this month to New York.
Jessica: Yeah. L.A. is another connecting flight. About half the passengers are getting on just for this leg.
David: I wish we could stay a bit longer. I have some friends living here that I haven’t seen in years.
Jessica: Don’t worry about it. You’ll probably stop in L.A. next month.
David: I hope so. I’ve always wanted to spend some time in L.A.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
David: So we’ll only be in Los Angeles for about forty-five minutes before we make our last, and longest, leg this month to New York.
Jessica: Yeah. L.A. is another connecting flight. About half the passengers are getting on just for this leg.
David: I wish we could stay a bit longer. I have some friends living here that I haven’t seen in years.
Jessica: Don’t worry about it. You’ll probably stop in L.A. next month.
David: I hope so. I’ve always wanted to spend some time in L.A.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Los Angeles.
Natalie: Los Angeles is the largest city and state of California and the 2nd largest city in the United States with a population of 3. 8 million people and is located in Southern California.
Braden: It is often referred to simply by its initials L. A. and has long been nicknamed the city of Angels. The greater Los Angeles area is home to over 18 million people.
Natalie: Los Angeles is the home base of Hollywood and is known as the entertainment capital of the world and many celebrities live there.
Braden: The economy of Los Angeles is driven by international trade, entertainment, technology, oil, and tourism. It is the 2nd largest economic region in the United States and the 3rd largest in the world producing a total of $735 billion annually.
Natalie: Some of the companies based in the Los Angeles area are farmers insurance, the cheesecake factory, Herbalife, sun-kissed, United online, health net, Northrop Grumman, Occidental Petroleum, and Guess?.
Braden: The city's largest private-sector employer is the University of Southern California which contributes an approximate $4 billion annually to the local economy.
Natalie: The University of Southern California is a research University with nearly 40,000 students enrolled and 10 colleges each ranking in the top 50 in the United States.
Braden: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we'll look at is...
Natalie: longest [natural native speed]
Braden: having a distance or length greater than anything else
Natalie: longest [slowly - broken down by syllable] longest [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: leg [natural native speed]
Braden: a section or stage of a journey or process
Natalie: leg [slowly - broken down by syllable] leg [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: connecting [natural native speed]
Braden: bringing together or into contact so that a link is established
Natalie: connecting [slowly - broken down by syllable] connecting [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: half [natural native speed]
Braden: either or two equal or corresponding parts
Natalie: half [slowly - broken down by syllable] half [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: passengers [natural native speed]
Braden: travelers on a public or private trip that are not the driver
Natalie: passengers [slowly - broken down by syllable] passengers [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: longer [natural native speed]
Braden: having a distance or length greater than something else
Natalie: longer [slowly - broken down by syllable] longer [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: living [natural native speed]
Braden: be alive at a particular place
Natalie: living [slowly - broken down by syllable] living [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: seen [natural native speed]
Braden: something that has been perceived by the eyes
Natalie: seen [slowly - broken down by syllable] seen [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the word “leg.”
Braden: This word has many possible meanings. My dictionary list at least eight.
Natalie: The meaning that's used in the dialogue is that of “leg of a journey.” In other words, a “leg” is a section or stage of a journey or process.
Braden: For example, the entire sentence from the dialogue is, “will only be in Los Angeles for another 45 minutes before we make our last, and longest, leg this month to New York.”
Natalie: Now, I don't know if this is actually true, but I remember one of my English teachers explaining to me that the reason why we use “leg” to refer to sections of a journey is because usually the journey is curved and not in a straight line.
Braden: Just like a leg that bends at the knee, right?
Natalie: Right. Like I said, I don't know if that's really the reason or if that's just a good way to remember the phrase.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) leg
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) leg
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: Yes. In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “spend some time.”
Braden: The phrase “spend some time” has the idea of showing the place where someone is staying for a period of time.
Natalie: So they're going to “spend some time” in LA. This phrase has many uses and is very versatile.
Braden: Now, the word “spend” usually has to deal with money. However not in this case. There doesn't necessarily have to be any money involved.
Natalie: Just one of the many possible uses could be, “I need to spend some time on my homework.”
Braden: That means you need to do your homework and that it will probably take some time.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) spend some time
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) spend some time
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is the future "will"
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: So we’ll only be in Los Angeles for about forty-five minutes.
Braden: In English, there are many different types of the future tense.
Natalie: In other words, there are many different ways of expressing future time.
Braden: One of the most common ways is using the “will.” The word “will” is called a modal auxiliary verb in this lesson we will explain the main meanings of “will."
Natalie: “Will” is an easy future tense to learn because “will” does not change its form, ever.
Braden: In other words, you don't conjugate “will.” However, “will” is often shortened to “'ll.” This is a contraction.
Natalie: You should also remember that “will” is always followed by the simple form of the main verb. Let's look at some examples.
Braden: Let’s look at situations using the First Person. – So, if your subject were "I," you could have a statement like –
Natalie: “I will start running.” Here, “will” could be contracted to – “I'll start running.”
Braden: The same pattern applies to “we.” If your subject were “we,” an example sentence could be –
Natalie: “We will start running.” Which could be contracted to – “We'll start running.”
Braden: It's important to note that native English speakers rarely, if ever, use “will” and first-person questions.
Natalie: In other words, a sentence like this – “Will I start running?”
Braden: Is very awkward in English. In this sentence, you seem to be asking to know something that you should already know.
Natalie: The same applies to the “we” pronoun. For example – “Will we start running?”
Braden: This is also very awkward in English.
Natalie: Now let’s look at Positive statements. – All other personal pronouns – such as you, he, she, it, and they – have the same sentence structure.
Braden: For example – “He will start running.” Or “It will start running.” Or “They will start running.”
Natalie: Next on to Questions. Questions can also easily be formed with these pronouns.
Braden: For example – “Will it start running?” Or “Will they start running?”
Natalie: Now let’s look at Negatives. The negatives are formed with the “will not” or “won't.”
Braden: For example – “She will not start running.” Or “She won't start running.”
Natalie: Let's review this lesson.
Braden: In English, there are many different types of the future tense or future time.
Natalie: One of the most common ways is using the “will.”
Braden: "Will” is called a modal auxiliary verb and in this lesson we explained the main meanings of “will."
Natalie: “Will” is an easy future tense to learn because “will” does not change its form, ever.
Braden: In other words, you don't conjugate “will.” However, “will” is often contracted to “'ll.”

Outro

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello to you all! This is the last stop before the season ends! What city do you think we'll cover in the last lesson?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:23 AM
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Hello Dragan,


Thank you for your comment and feedback. 😄


I don't think I have completely understood your comment, what did you mean by 'frase leg?' 'Frase' isn't a word.


The "longest leg" is a term that means 'the longest part.'


I hope this is helpful to you.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Dragan Petrovic
Tuesday at 11:33 PM
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We need better explanation for frase leg or longest leg.

My opinion is that in not beginer study.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:41 AM
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Hi Ventsislav,


Thank you for your comment! 😉

We are very happy to have you here studying with us.

If you ever have any questions, please let us know!


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Ventsislav
Wednesday at 05:41 PM
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It is good for me to know about leg, because if I don't know I will look like a full 😎