Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good afternoon!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 25 - You're Going to Make a Great English Speaker!
Braden: Hello, and welcome to EnglishClass101.com, where we study modern English in a fun educational format.
Natalie: So brush up on the English that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us in this lesson. Natalie, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Braden: In this lesson, you'll learn about using the past and future perfect.
Natalie: This conversation takes place in the employee meeting after the flight.
Braden: And it’s between Michael and Jessica.
Natalie: Michael is still trying to get to know his crew mates but still doesn’t know Jessica very well. They are speaking professionally.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Michael: Good work Jessica! It's been a long month with a few adventures and far too much turbulence.
Jessica: Not to mention almost running into a hurricane.
Michael: Yeah, that was a new one for me as well. I hope I don't have to do that again.
Jessica: Nor do we. But I had a good time at the Broncos game.
Michael: I think David learned a lot too. This was a good run for a new guy. He's going to make a great flight attendant.
Jessica: And New York is a great city to celebrate completing his first month of work.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Michael: Good work Jessica! It's been a long month with a few adventures and far too much turbulence.
Jessica: Not to mention almost running into a hurricane.
Michael: Yeah, that was a new one for me as well. I hope I don't have to do that again.
Jessica: Nor do we. But I had a good time at the Broncos game.
Michael: I think David learned a lot too. This was a good run for a new guy. He's going to make a great flight attendant.
Jessica: And New York is a great city to celebrate completing his first month of work.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about New York City.
Natalie: New York City is the largest city in the United States and one of the largest cities in the world with a population of 8. 2 million people.
Braden: The greater New York metropolitan area contains over 22. 1 million people.
Natalie: New York is a major tourist destination and receives approximately 15,000,000 visitors annually. It is home to the Empire State building, Central Park, and functions as the financial capital of the world.
Braden: It's home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization and has one of the most extensive subway and rapid transit systems in the world.
Natalie: In terms of gross metropolitan product, New York City is the largest regional economy in the United States and the 2nd largest city economy in the world generating $1. 3 trillion annually.
Braden: New York City is home to 45 Fortune 500 companies, the New York Stock Exchange, Wall Street, and the NASDAQ. The city's television and film industry is also the second-largest in the country after Hollywood.
Natalie: Columbia University, New York University, and Rockefeller University are major international research universities each ranked among the top 50 in the world. New York is also home to the United Nations.
Braden: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we'll look at is...
Natalie: adventures [natural native speed]
Braden: unusual or exciting experiences or activities
Natalie: adventures [slowly - broken down by syllable] adventures [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: turbulence [natural native speed]
Braden: a violent or unsteady movement of air
Natalie: turbulence [slowly - broken down by syllable] turbulence [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: mention [natural native speed]
Braden: refer to something briefly and without going into detail
Natalie: mention [slowly - broken down by syllable] mention [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: hurricane [natural native speed]
Braden: a storm of a violent wind; a tropical cyclone in the Caribbean
Natalie: hurricane [slowly - broken down by syllable] hurricane [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: again [natural native speed]
Braden: another time
Natalie: again [slowly - broken down by syllable] again [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: bronco [natural native speed]
Braden: a wild horse typical of the western United States
Natalie: bronco [slowly - broken down by syllable] bronco [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: professional [natural native speed]
Braden: connected with a profession
Natalie: professional [slowly - broken down by syllable] professional [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: attendant [natural native speed]
Braden: a person employed to provide a service
Natalie: attendant [slowly - broken down by syllable] attendant [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: celebrate [natural native speed]
Braden: to publicly knowledge with a social gathering or enjoyable activity
Natalie: celebrate [slowly - broken down by syllable] celebrate [natural native speed]
Braden: And last...
Natalie: completing [natural native speed]
Braden: having all the necessary or appropriate parts
Natalie: completing [slowly - broken down by syllable] completing [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “not to mention.”
Braden: This raises a very interesting one. The phrase “not to mention” is used to introduce an additional fact or point that reinforces some other point or the original point that's being made.
Natalie: So for example, from the dialogue Michael and Jessica are talking about the difficult month and the many adventures that they had had.
Braden: And Jessica reminds Michael about the hurricane by using the phrase “not to mention” as an introduction.
Natalie: She says, “not to mention almost running into a hurricane.”
Braden: Another possible way of using “not to mention” is in the sentence, “where'd you find the time, not to mention the energy, to do so much?”
Natalie: This is a question that's often asked of very productive people.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) not to mention
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) not to mention
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase a good run
Braden: This phrase, is actually part of a larger idiom which is, “have a good run for one's money.”
Natalie: The idea here is to get some kind of reward or enjoyment for the effort that you put into doing something.
Braden: So, in explanation, Michael says to Jessica, “that was a good run for a new guy.” By this he means him “for the effort that David has put in, he has had a good run.”
Natalie: In other words, he's learned a lot in a short period of time.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) have a good run for one's money
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) have a good run for one's money
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is the future tense "be going to"
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: He’s going to make a great flight attendant.
Braden: In English, there are many different types of the future tense.
Natalie: In other words, there are many different ways of expressing future time.
Braden: One of the most common ways is using the “be going to.” In this lesson, we will explain the main meanings of “be going to."
Natalie: “Be Going To” is an easy future tense to learn because only the "be" part of "be going to" is conjugated.
Braden: Frequently the "be" verb is contracted with verbs that come before.
Natalie: Remember that “be going to” is always followed by the simple form of the main verb. Let's look at the rules.
Braden: To make a verb form with “be going to,” first put “be into the correct form so that it agrees with the subject of the sentence.
Natalie: Then, you just add “going to” and then follow that with a simple form of the next verb. An example sentence would be –
Braden: “I am going to stay.” This can be contracted to – “I'm going to stay.”
Natalie: This can also be in a question form such as – “Am I going to stay?”
Braden: As well as in a negative form such as do “I am not going to stay.”
Natalie: This same pattern applies to all statements using personal pronouns.
Braden: For example – “You're going to stay.” Or “She is going to stay.”
Natalie: This also applies to questions using personal pronouns. For example –
Braden: “Is it going to stay?” Or “Are they going to stay?”
Natalie: This pattern also applies to negative statements using the same personal pronouns. However, with negative statements the possibilities for contraction increase.
Braden: For example, The positive statement – “We are going to stay.” Could have three possible negative statement variations.
Natalie: Those would be – “We are not going to stay.” And “We're not going to stay.” And “We aren't going to stay.”
Braden: The contraction “aren't” is typically only used in spoken name, not written English.
Natalie: Let's review this lesson.
Braden: In English, there are many different types of the future tenses and ways of expressing future time.
Natalie: One of the most common ways is using the “be going to” which is what we talked about in this lesson.
Braden: “Be Going To” is an easy future tense to learn because only the "be" part of "be going to" is conjugated.
Natalie: Frequently, the "be" verb is contracted with verbs that come before, especially in spoken English.
Braden: Remember that “be going to” is always followed by the simple form of the main verb.

Outro

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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And we did it! The last lesson in our first Upper Beginner series! Well done! What have you learned? What would you like to learn in the next seasons?

Benny
Monday at 07:01 PM
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Hello I have a question,


Michael said: Yeah, "that" was a new one for me as well. I hope I don't have to do "that" again.


Can I use "this" instead of "that"?