Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good afternoon!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 3 - On Your Way to Meet an American Hurricane.
Natalie: Hi, my name is Natalie. And I’m joined by Braden.
Braden: Welcome back to EnglishClass101.com!
Natalie: What are we learning today?
Braden: In this lesson, you'll will learn about using the preposition “on”
Natalie: This conversation takes place in the evening on the plane.
Braden: And it’s between Michael and Amanda.
Natalie: This is Michael’s and Amanda’s first flight together so they are speaking professionally.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Michael: We'd like to thank all of you for flying with us and hope you have a safe stay in the Tampa Bay area.
(sound of intercom switch turning off)
Michael: This landing is going to be very difficult.
Amanda: Yes it will. I never thought I'd be on a plane heading 'toward' a hurricane.
Michael: I was once but we weren't this close. You could see the eye of the storm from flight altitude.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Michael: We'd like to thank all of you for flying with us and hope you have a safe stay in the Tampa Bay area.
(sound of intercom switch turning off)
Michael: This landing is going to be very difficult.
Amanda: Yes it will. I never thought I'd be on a plane heading 'toward' a hurricane.
Michael: I was once but we weren't this close. You could see the eye of the storm from flight altitude.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: Okay so, in this lesson, we wanted to talk a little bit about Tampa Bay.
Natalie: Tampa is a large city in the west of Florida. Tampa is a part of the metropolitan area, referred to as the Tampa Bay area. To be completely accurate, there is no city in Florida called “Tampa Bay.” However, the metropolitan area around Tampa and the Bay where Tampa is locate is called "Tampa Bay." The greater Tampa Bay area has just over 4 million residents.
Braden: Tampa is home to several large Fortune 1000 companies however the most notable employer is the US Department of Defense.
Natalie: The MacDill Air Force Base, located in Tampa, is home to the United States Central command, the United States Marine forces Central command, and the United States special operations command.
Braden: Tampa is also a major port city and is currently the largest port in Florida and 7th largest in the United States.
Natalie: The Tampa Bay area is also home to the University of South Florida. In 2010 the campus enrollment was over 46,000 students.
Braden: The University of South Florida hosts one of the most complete audio libraries of classic literature available. It can be downloaded in podcast format from the iTunes Store.
Natalie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is...
Natalie: flying [natural native speed]
Braden: moving or able to move through the air with wings
Natalie: flying [slowly - broken down by syllable] flying [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: safe [natural native speed]
Braden: metal container where valuables (money) are kept
Natalie: safe [slowly - broken down by syllable] safe [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: stay [natural native speed]
Braden: time spent in a place
Natalie: stay [slowly - broken down by syllable] stay [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: pilot [natural native speed]
Braden: a person who flies a plane
Natalie: pilot [slowly - broken down by syllable] pilot [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: plane [natural native speed]
Braden: an airplane
Natalie: plane [slowly - broken down by syllable] plane [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: hurricane [natural native speed]
Braden: a storm of a violent wind; a tropical cyclone in the Caribbean
Natalie: hurricane [slowly - broken down by syllable] hurricane [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: altitude [natural native speed]
Braden: the height of an object or point in relation to sea level or ground level
Natalie: altitude [slowly - broken down by syllable] altitude [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: toward [natural native speed]
Braden: in the direction of
Natalie: toward [slowly - broken down by syllable] toward [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "eye of the storm."
Braden: This phrase as a reference to hurricanes as well as other types of storms.
Natalie: There is a natural phenomenon with hurricanes where the center of the storm is calm.
Braden: It’s as if there were some kind of invisible pillar going through the center of the hurricane.
Natalie: When viewed from above, the hurricane looks kind of like an eye, which is where this phrase comes from.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) eye of the storm
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) eye of the storm
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "flight altitude."
Braden: This phrase refers to the distance from the ground the plane needs to reach in order to fly naturally.
Natalie: Now, technically, as soon as the plane leaves the ground is already in flight.
Braden: However, when a pilot or airline crew member says “flight altitude” they are referring to the altitude necessary for them to fly horizontally.
Natalie: Because of this, most commercial airplanes fly best between 25,000 and 40,000 feet.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) flight altitude
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) flight altitude
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Natalie: The focus of this lesson is the preposition "on".
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: I’ve been on a plane that did once.
Braden: Okay so, the word "on" is a preposition and has many different meanings and uses. My dictionary lists sixteen ways that "on" is used and then a long list of phrases that use "on."
Natalie: That sounds about right. The basic idea is that "on" is used when something is physically in contact with the outside of something else, usually with the top.
Braden: However, there are uses where "on" is actually used when referring to the inside of something, like when dealing with transportation.
Natalie: "On" is frequently used in phrases and idioms like "on-air" which means something is being broadcast.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll look at using "on" with transportation, time, and communication.
Natalie: Okay so, Let’s take a look at Transportation."On" is used frequently is phrases dealing with transportation. For example,
Braden: "I went to the store on a bus."
Natalie: Here, "on" is actually referring to the inside of the bus. This might seem confusing but just remember that you're "on" the platform where the passengers are.
Braden: You're not on the top of the bus. (haha)
Natalie: Another example would be - "We traveled to Paris on a train."
Braden: Here, again, think of yourself on the part of the train for passengers, not the top of the train.
Natalie: Now let's look at using "on" with time. For example,
Braden: "My birthday party will be on Friday."
Natalie: Here, the birthday party will take place on Friday. Remember that when you use specific days of the week or dates of the month, then you always use "on." Another example would be –
Braden: "The meeting will be held on the 18th."
Natalie: Okay so last, we'll look at using "on" with communication. You use "on" with phrases that talk about communication. For example,
Braden: "She called me on my cell phone." or "I heard it on the radio."
Natalie: In these examples, "on" is used to specify the means of communication, such as "my cell phone" and "the radio."
Braden: That's right. I don't really know why we do this in English, but we do.
Natalie: Yeah, that one doesn't have an easy answer. But anyway, let's move on to the lesson review.
Braden: The preposition "on" means that something is in contact with the surface of something else.
Natalie: However, there are many exceptions.
Braden: "On" is used when talking about certain types of transportation,
Natalie: when talking about specific days of the week,
Braden: and when talking about means of communication. That just about does it for this lesson.

Outro

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello EnglishClass101.com listeners! Have you ever had a difficult landing?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 05:39 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello David,


Thank you for your kind feedback!


Perfect deduction on the lesson good job!😄


Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,


Patricia

Team EnglishClass101.com

David
Saturday at 02:42 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Teacher,

Thank you for the explanation of the use of in and on. Comparing the selection of ON and IN for each vehicle, it seems that: (1) we are ON bigger vehicles, but we are IN smaller vehicles. However, for vehicles that we can't get into them such as bicycles, we use ON again. Does my deduction make sense to you? Thanks.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:51 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Leon,


For most types of transport, such as bus, train or airplane, we use "on".


"I am on the bus."

"I am on the train."

"I am on the airplane."

"I am on the boat."


But for cars, we use "in".


"I am in the car."

"I am in the taxi."


If you say "I am on the car", it sounds like you are on top of the car!


I hope that helps!


Kellie

Team EnglishClass101.com

Leon
Tuesday at 03:29 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I have a question about in & on. you using a example: I went to the store on a bus. but in lesson 1, there has another example : I went to New York in her car. what's different? can I use I went to New York on her car?