Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good morning!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 6 - Need More English Encouragement?
Natalie: Hello, everyone. I’m Natalie. Welcome to EnglishClass101.com!
Braden: With us, you’ll learn to speak English in fun and effective lessons.
Natalie: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Braden: and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Braden: In this lesson, you will learn about Using phrases that don’t use prepositions.
Natalie: This conversation takes place on the plane, just before the passengers start leaving the plane.
Braden: And it’s between Ashely and David.
Natalie: David is still inexperienced so he’ll be speaking timidly and Ashley will try to reassure him.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Ashley: Are you ready to do the safety demonstration, David?
David: I think so.
Ashley: You think so?
David: Yeah. I just get a bit of stage fright sometimes.
Ashley: Didn't you practice in school?
David: No. My first time was last Tuesday on our way to St. Louis. I've only done it once before.
Ashley: Don't worry. You'll get used to doing the safety demonstration. It's really easier than you think.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ashley: Are you ready to do the safety demonstration, David?
David: I think so.
Ashley: You think so?
David: Yeah. I just get a bit of stage fright sometimes.
Ashley: Didn't you practice in school?
David: No. My first time was last Tuesday on our way to St. Louis. I've only done it once before.
Ashley: Don't worry. You'll get used to doing the safety demonstration. It's really easier than you think.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, in this lesson, you'll learn a little bit about St. Louis
Natalie: That's right. St. Louis is located on the eastern border of Missouri and has a population of 318,000.
Braden: The greater metropolitan area, however, has a population of 2. 8 million which makes it the 18th largest metropolitan area and the 20th largest economy within the United States.
Natalie: The economy of St. Louis is fairly diverse. The region is home to several billion-dollar corporations including – Enterprise Rent a Car, Anheuser-Busch, and Energizer.
Braden: The healthcare sector employs over 34,000 workers which is the largest number of workers in any sector in St. Louis. St. Louis is also home to two national research universities namely Washington University of St. Louis and St. Louis University. Great places to go to school.
Natalie: The major tourist destination in St. Louis is the Gateway Arch. The Gateway Arch is a monument to the western expansion of the United States and stands 633 feet tall.
Braden: That's a big arch.
Natalie: It’s beautiful, I’ve been there.
Braden: Okay, let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Natalie: safety [natural native speed]
Braden: the condition of being protected from harm
Natalie: safety [slowly - broken down by syllable] safety [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: demonstration [natural native speed]
Braden: a practical exhibition and explanation
Natalie: demonstration [slowly - broken down by syllable] demonstration [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: sometimes [natural native speed]
Braden: at times; now and then; occasionally
Natalie: sometimes [slowly - broken down by syllable] sometimes [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: stage [natural native speed]
Braden: a point, period, or step in a process for development
Natalie: stage [slowly - broken down by syllable] stage [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: fright [natural native speed]
Braden: a sudden intense feeling of fear
Natalie: fright [slowly - broken down by syllable] fright [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: school [natural native speed]
Braden: an institution for education
Natalie: school [slowly - broken down by syllable] school [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: practice [natural native speed]
Braden: perform or exercise repeatedly or regularly
Natalie: practice [slowly - broken down by syllable] practice [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: intercom [natural native speed]
Braden: an electrical device allowing communication
Natalie: intercom [slowly - broken down by syllable] intercom [natural native speed]
Braden: And last...
Natalie: listen [natural native speed]
Braden: to pay attention to a sound
Natalie: listen [slowly - broken down by syllable] listen [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "stage fright."
Braden: The dictionary defines “stage fright” as "nervousness before or during an appearance before an audience.”
Natalie: This is a very common experience for most people. At least it is for me and everyone I know.
Braden: The expression comes from actors going “on stage” and then becoming frightened after seeing all of the audience members looking at them.
Natalie: There are many stories of actors forgetting their lines because of “stage fright.”
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) stage fright
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) stage fright
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “get used to."
Braden: The phrase “get used to...” is frequently used in English.
Natalie: Yes it is. “get used to” has the same feeling as “to become accustomed with” or sometimes “to become familiar with.”
Braden: We have a special pronunciation tip with this phrase. Frequently, second-language learners try and separate the “used” and the “two” words.
Natalie: However, in natural native English the pronunciation of the “D” and the “T” are combined.
Braden: So the pronunciation becomes "get" "use" "to" not “get use'd' to." – Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) get used to
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) get used to
Braden: So let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is phrases that don't use prepositions.
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: My first time was last Tuesday on our way to St. Louis.
Braden: Okay so, Prepositions are what we're looking at in this lesson. Prepositions are frequently used in English. In fact, in almost any sentence you say, there's probably a preposition or two or more.
Natalie: However, there are a few phrases where you shouldn't use any preposition.
Braden: That's right. Our first example is when the verb "to go" is used with the noun "home."
Natalie: Usually when you use the verb "to go" you use either "to" or "at" right after it. However, with the noun "home" you don't put in any preposition. For example,
Braden: "We need to go home."
Natalie: If you were to say "my house" instead of "home," then you would need a preposition. For example,
Braden: "We need to go 'to' my house."
Natalie: But with the word "home" you don't use any preposition. Even in the past tense you still don't use a preposition. For example,
Braden: "They went home."
Natalie: Next we'll learn about phrases that use "last" and "next" and days of the week.
Braden: Okay! Usually when you're talking about just a day of the week, you'll use a preposition. For example,
Natalie: "I went in to the office 'on' Tuesday."
Braden: However, when you use the words "last" or "next" before the days of the week, then you shouldn't use a preposition. For example,
Natalie: "I went into the office last Tuesday." Another example would be "She will come next Tuesday."
Braden: Last, we'll look at using the word "every" with weeks, months, and years. I often hear English learners say,
Natalie: "We have a test 'in' every week."
Braden: Yeah, a friend of mine said, "He leaves at 10 'on' every Wednesday."
Natalie: I'm not sure why this happens, however, I often hear it. In both of these examples, the correct way is without the preposition,
Braden: "We have a test every week."
Natalie: or "He leaves at 10 every Wednesday."
Braden: That's right. Don't use a preposition.
Natalie: Let's review this lesson.
Braden: Okay so, English uses many prepositions; however, in some cases, prepositions shouldn't be used.
Natalie: The first situation is with the noun "home." You don't use a preposition before the noun "home."
Braden: The second situation is when you use the words "last" and "next" with days of the week.
Natalie: If it were just the days of the week, then you would have to use the preposition on. But with the words "last" and "next" you don't use any preposition.
Braden: The last situation where you don't use prepositions is with the word "every." As in, "We have a meeting every Tuesday."
Braden: That just about does it for this lesson.

Outro

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Monday at 06:30 PM
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Good morning EnglishClass101.com listeners! Did you know these rules for not using prepositions?