Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Hello, everyone!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 7 - It's a Long Way to the Shop if you Want Some Bananas in the US.
Braden: Hello, and welcome to EnglishClass101.com, where we study modern English in a fun educational format.
Natalie: So brush up on the English that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us in this lesson. Natalie, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Braden: In this lesson, you'll learn about using the words "some" and "any."
Natalie: This conversation takes place on the street in the morning before they board the plane.
Braden: And it’s between David and Michael.
Natalie: David and Michael have been working together for over a week and have become best friends. They are speaking casually.
DIALOGUE
David: Dude! The grocery store is closed.
Michael: Isn't there another one nearby?
David: I don't know. I've never been here before.
Michael: Check your GPS again. Are you sure you put in the data correctly?
David: Yes I am. The screen is marking this part of Baltimore as the end point.
Michael: All I wanted was some bananas. Is that too much to ask?
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
David: Dude! The grocery store is closed.
Michael: Isn't there another one nearby?
David: I don't know. I've never been here before.
Michael: Check your GPS again. Are you sure you put in the data correctly?
David: Yes I am. The screen is marking this part of Baltimore as the end point.
Michael: All I wanted was some bananas. Is that too much to ask?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, let's talk about Baltimore.
Natalie: Okay. Baltimore is the largest city in the state of Maryland and is a major port city. It's located in the central area of the state near the Chesapeake Bay.
Braden: In 2010, Baltimore had the population of 620,000 and the Baltimore metropolitan area had a population of approximately 2. 7 million.
Natalie: Baltimore was a major port throughout American history and during the war of 1812 was attacked by the British.
Braden: Francis Scott Key watched the attack and later wrote the poem “The Star-Spangled Banner” recounting the attack. This poem was later put to music and became the national anthem of the United States.
Natalie: Baltimore was once a major industrial center. However, modern Baltimore now has a service economy providing financial business and health services for the southern mid-Atlantic region.
Braden: There are many famous and respected universities throughout the city. The most famous of which are the Johns Hopkins University and the related Johns Hopkins Hospital.
Natalie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is...
Natalie: grocery [natural native speed]
Braden: items of food sold in a grocery store
Natalie: grocery [slowly - broken down by syllable] grocery [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: nearby [natural native speed]
Braden: near; in the immediate area
Natalie: nearby [slowly - broken down by syllable] nearby [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: GPS [natural native speed]
Braden: abbreviation for – Global Positioning System
Natalie: GPS [slowly - broken down by syllable] GPS [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: check [natural native speed]
Braden: to examine, to review, to look at, to look again at something
Natalie: check [slowly - broken down by syllable] check [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: data [natural native speed]
Braden: facts and statistics collected together for reference
Natalie: data [slowly - broken down by syllable] data [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: correctly [natural native speed]
Braden: in a way that is true, factual, or appropriate
Natalie: correctly [slowly - broken down by syllable] correctly [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: banana [natural native speed]
Braden: banana
Natalie: banana [slowly - broken down by syllable] banana [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: screen [natural native speed]
Braden: a fixed or movable upright partition used to divide a room
Natalie: screen [slowly - broken down by syllable] screen [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: part [natural native speed]
Braden: a piece or segment of something
Natalie: part [slowly - broken down by syllable] part [natural native speed]
Braden: And last...
Natalie: ask [natural native speed]
Braden: to request an answer to a question
Natalie: ask [slowly - broken down by syllable] ask [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "end point."
Braden: The phrase “end point” refers to the last stage of a journey or process.
Natalie: This is a very common phrase in English. It is used in geometry, chemistry, clinical research, and in travel.
Braden: The idea is simple, that at this particular “point” whatever was happening will “end.”
Natalie: In other words, something that was going will “end” at this “point.” This will be its “endpoint.”
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) end point
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) end point
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: Our next phrase is "isn’t there another."
Braden: What we wanted to point out with this phrase is the contraction “isn't.” It's important to use the contraction in this way.
Natalie: In this sentence, and in this context, if you were to say “is not there another,” it would sound very awkward and would probably be somewhat difficult to say.
Braden: It would be the same if you were to say “is there not another.” This sounds like you spent too much time reading Shakespeare. This is English from the 16th century.
Natalie: Either of these options would be grammatically correct but we don't speak like that anymore.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) isn’t there another
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) isn’t there another
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is the words "some" and "any”
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: All I wanted was some bananas.
Braden: In this lesson we are going to introduce the words "some" and "any" which are called determiners.
Natalie: Determiners modify a word slightly to show amount. The determiners "some" and "any" don't show a specific amount.
Braden: These two words are often difficult for English learners because they are not specific.
Natalie: That's right. The dictionary defines the word “some” as – "an unspecified amount or number of.” Not much of a definition if you ask me.
Braden: (haha) The dictionary also defines the word "any" as – one or some of a thing or number of things, no matter how much or many. Not a great definition.
Natalie: In the dictionary's defense, how do you define something that is non-specific? I think this is what makes them so hard to use.
Braden: However, in this lesson we're going to look at one difference between the words “some” and “any.” This will help you use the words correctly.
Natalie: First, let's take a look at the word "some."
Braden: Okay, so, “Some” is used in positive statements. For example –
Natalie: “Benjamin gave Sarah some money.”
Braden: Here, the determiner "some" gives the feeling that the amount of money was small. Another example would be –
Natalie: “Renée bought some candles.”
Braden: Here again, “some” gives the feeling that the number of candles was more than one however not very many.
Natalie: And remember that the word “some” is used in positive statements. For negative statements, you'll use "any."
Braden: That's right. For example, the phrase "Benjamin didn't give Sarah some money.." is incorrect. You should say
Natalie: “Benjamin didn't give Sarah any money.”
Braden: Here the determiner “any” emphasizes the fact that Benjamin didn't give money to Sarah. Another example could be –
Natalie: “Renée didn't buy any candles.”
Braden: Here, “any” gives the feeling that not even one candle was purchased by Rene.
Natalie: Let's review this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson we learned about determiners. Specifically, we learned about the determiners “some” and “any.”
Natalie: These two determiners are frequently used in very similar sentences. However, they have different meanings and uses.
Braden: In this lesson we went over one specific difference between these two words.
Natalie: Mainly that “some” is used in positive statements and that “any” is used in negative statements.
Braden: In future lessons, we will review and learn more about the differences between “some” and “any.”
Braden: That just about does it for today.

Outro

3 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Good afternoon EnglishClasss101.com listeners! How are you liking the series so far?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 08:34 PM
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Hello Abdeljelil,


Thank you for taking the time to write to us.


The difference between the two example sentences you mentioned is the past tense word 'wanted.' This indicates that they 'wanted' bananas in the past but didn't get them. "All I want are some bananas" could indicate that the person may obtain some bananas in the future.


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

abdeljelil
Saturday at 04:48 PM
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Hello

"All I wanted was some bananas" here in this sentence we used the simple past, can we use the simple present so the phrase becomes " all I want are some bananas"? if so, what's the difference between them? I mean are both of them correct?

thanks.