Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Hi there!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 8 - A Trip to an American Steakhouse.
Natalie: Hi, my name is Natalie. And I’m joined by Braden.
Braden: Hello, everyone! Welcome back to EnglishClass101.com!
Natalie: What are we learning today?
Braden: In this lesson, you'll learn about using the regular plural of nouns.
Natalie: This conversation takes place in the evening on the street.
Braden: And it’s between David and a woman.
Natalie: David is lost in San Jose and is asking a woman on the street for directions. They are speaking respectfully.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
David: Excuse me. I'm not from San Jose. Could you tell me how to get to "Alexander's," please?
Woman: "Alexander's?" You mean the little steakhouse on the corner?
David: I'll bet that's it. I'm a flight attendant, and my crew is supposed to meet me there in a few hours.
Woman: Well, it's three streets that way then turn left. There's a big sign that says "Alexander's."
David: Thank you!
Woman: You're welcome.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
David: Excuse me. I'm not from San Jose. Could you tell me how to get to "Alexander's," please?
Woman: "Alexander's?" You mean the little steakhouse on the corner?
David: I'll bet that's it. I'm a flight attendant, and my crew is supposed to meet me there in a few hours.
Woman: Well, it's three streets that way then turn left. There's a big sign that says "Alexander's."
David: Thank you!
Woman: You're welcome.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, in this lesson you're going to learn a bit about San Jose.
Natalie: That's right. San Jose is one of those cities that many American's have heard of but most don't know much about it. So to start things off, San Jose is the 3rd largest city in California and the 10th largest city in the United States.
Braden: It is located near the San Francisco Bay Area and is part of the 6th largest metropolitan area in the United States at 7.6 million people.
Natalie: San Jose is in the area known as Silicon Valley. Silicon Valley is home to many high tech companies such as Adobe, Cisco Systems, eBay, and has major facilities for IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Netgear, and TiVo.
Braden: There are many universities and colleges in the area. Three of the most notable are the University of California Berkeley, California State University, and Stanford University.
Natalie: Just so you have an idea of how large these universities are, the largest is San Jose State University with approximately 30,000 students and over 130 different Bachelors and Masters degree programs.
Braden: Any of these schools would be excellent places to go to school or work. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Natalie: steakhouse [natural native speed]
Braden: a restaurant that specializes in serving steaks
Natalie: steakhouse [slowly - broken down by syllable] steakhouse [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: corner [natural native speed]
Braden: an angle where two or more sides meet
Natalie: corner [slowly - broken down by syllable] corner [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: crew [natural native speed]
Braden: a group of people who work on and operate some kind of ship
Natalie: crew [slowly - broken down by syllable] crew [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: streets [natural native speed]
Braden: public roads in a city or town
Natalie: streets [slowly - broken down by syllable] streets [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: turn [natural native speed]
Braden: to move in a particular direction
Natalie: turn [slowly - broken down by syllable] turn [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: flight [natural native speed]
Braden: act of flying
Natalie: flight [slowly - broken down by syllable] flight [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: attendant [natural native speed]
Braden: a person employed to provide a service
Natalie: attendant [slowly - broken down by syllable] attendant [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "to get to."
Braden: The phrase “to get to” is talking about arrival. Often, the verb “get” is difficult to understand because it has so many meanings.
Natalie: Our tip here is to pay attention to the context. In this sentence, "get" is talking about arrival at a particular location and because of that you can understand that “get” has the meaning of arrival.
Braden: Also, usually when “get” has the meaning of arrival it's followed by the preposition "to." This isn't a rule. However, it is very common. It's a good trigger.
Natalie: So when you see “to get to,” you'll know that it's probably talking about arrival.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) to get to
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) to get to
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: Our next phrase is "Could you,...please?"
Braden: This phrase is used to politely make a request.
Natalie: To use this phrase, you say “could you” and then insert your request.
Braden: Some example request could be“come over here.” Or “share some pizza with me.”
Natalie: And then at the end, after your request, you add the word “please?” This gives it the added measure or added feeling of politeness and kindness.
Braden: So altogether it would be, "Could you come over here please?”
Natalie: Or "Could you share some pizza with me, please?”
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) Could you,...please?
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) Could you,...please?
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is the regular plurals of nouns
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: Well, it’s three streets that way.
Braden: Okay so, The majority of nouns in English have both singular and plural forms.
Natalie: For most of these nouns, the plural form is made by adding in “–s” to the singular form.
Braden: However, there are a few exceptions to this rule.
Natalie: Our first exception is when the noun ends in S, X, CH or SH. There are many words that have these endings. To pluralize nouns that have these endings add “–es.” We'll go through these pretty quick because there are quite a few of them.
Braden: Let's look at the words boss, tax, and bush to get an idea.
Natalie: First we have the noun “boss” which becomes “bosses” spelled “b-o-s-s-e-s."
Braden: Our second noun is “tax.” “Tax" becomes “taxes” spelled “t-a-x-e-s."
Natalie: And last we have “bush.” “Bush” becomes "bushes” spelled “b-u-s-h-e-s.”
Braden: Next let's have a look at nouns that end in a consonant plus an "y." When the noun ends in "consonant plus y" then the "y" changes to an "i" and then you had “-es.”
Natalie: Our example nouns here will be "baby," "candy," and "currency."
Braden: First we have the noun "baby" which becomes the "babies" spelled “b-a-b-i-e-s."
Natalie: Our second noun is "city" which becomes "cities" spelled “c-i-t-i-e-s."
Braden: Our last noun is “currency” which becomes “currencies.” This is spelled "c-u-r-r-e-n-c-i-e-s."
Natalie: For pretty much anything else, except for the irregulars, you just add an S at the end of the noun to make it plural.
Braden: Let's review this basic rule of just adding "s.". Our nouns are going to be dog, hair, and week.
Natalie: So first we have the noun “dog.” this becomes plural by adding an S at the end and we get “dogs” spelled “d-o-g-s."
Braden: Our second noun is "hair" which in its plural form is “hairs" Spelled “h-a-i-r-s."
Natalie: And our last noun is “week" which becomes plural by adding an "s" at the end to get “weeks.” This is spelled “w-e-e-k-s."
Braden: That sounds about right. Thanks for that explanation.
Natalie: You're welcome. Let's review this lesson.
Braden: Let's. The majority of nouns in English can be both singular and plural.
Natalie: For most nouns, the plural form is made by simply adding an "s" to the singular form.
Braden: However, there are a few exceptions to this rule.
Natalie: The first exception is with the letters "s," "x," "ch" and "sh." When a noun has these endings, you add "-es" to make it plural.
Braden: The other exception is when the noun ends in a consonant and then a "y." In these situations, the "y" changes to an "i" and then you add -es.
Braden: That just about does it for today.

Outro

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello EnglishClass101.com listeners! I have some friends that live in San Jose. They say it's awesome. Do you plan on visiting San Jose?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:34 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Ahmed,


This is lesson 8. :)


Keep studying!


Adam


Team EnglishClass101.com

Ahmed
Tuesday at 06:25 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello


Braden said "lesson 8" and it is lesson 7..... which is correct?


Thank you