Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalie: Good afternoon!
Braden: Braden here. Upper Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 9 - Will You Be Going on a Date Tonight in the US?
Natalie: Hi, my name is Natalie. And I’m joined by Braden.
Braden: Hello, everyone! Welcome back to EnglishClass101.com!
Natalie: What are we learning today?
Braden: In this lesson, you will learn about the future forms of verbs.
Natalie: This conversation takes place on the plane during the shift.
Braden: And it’s between Michael and Jessica.
Natalie: Michael is trying to get to know his crew mates but still doesn’t know Jessica very well. They are speaking professionally.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Michael: Hey, Jess! One of our days off is going to be in Denver. Do you want to go to a Denver Broncos game?
Jessica: Well Michael, um...I'm married.
Michael: Oh, sorry! I didn't mean a date. The rest of the crew is going, so I'm inviting you as well. It isn't a date.
Jessica: Oh! Alright, sorry about that.
Michael: No problem.
Jessica: Sure! I'd love to go. Just so long as no one makes fun of me for not knowing much about football.
Braden: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Michael: Hey, Jess! One of our days off is going to be in Denver. Do you want to go to a Denver Broncos game?
Jessica: Well Michael, um...I'm married.
Michael: Oh, sorry! I didn't mean a date. The rest of the crew is going, so I'm inviting you as well. It isn't a date.
Jessica: Oh! Alright, sorry about that.
Michael: No problem.
Jessica: Sure! I'd love to go. Just so long as no one makes fun of me for not knowing much about football.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: Okay so, let's talk a little bit about Denver.
Natalie: Okay. Denver is the largest city and capital of the state of Colorado. It's nicknamed the mile high city because it's official elevation is exactly 1 mile or 5,280 feet above sea level.
Braden: The 105th meridian west of Greenwich passes through Union Station in Denver and this is the temporal reference point for the mountain time zone.
Natalie: As of 2010, the population of Denver was just over 600,000 which ranks it at the 27th most populous city in the United States. The surrounding metropolitan area has an estimated population of 2.5 million. Denver ranks as the 17th richest city in the United States.
Braden: Denver's economic wealth is based in part on its location since it's well positioned between the East and the West coasts. Naturally, it became a shipping, storage, transport, and distribution area for goods and services to the Mountain states, the Southwest states, as well as the entire Western coast.
Natalie: Many billion-dollar companies such as Molson Coors brewing Company, Newmont Mining Corporation, Halliburton, and Smith international are present in Denver.
Braden: Again, because of geography, Denver had a considerable governmental presence with a national renewable energy laboratory, the Denver mint, and a former nuclear weapons plant called Rocky Flats.
Natalie: So, if you're into shipping or thinking about working in the shipping industry, Denver might be a good place for you.
Braden: It just might. Remember though, it gets pretty cold.
Natalie: That's great weather for skiing! Even though about 2 months of the year it's below freezing.
Braden: Yeah, pretty cold. It keeps the snow around longer. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Natalie: bronco [natural native speed]
Braden: a wild horse typical of the western United States
Natalie: bronco [slowly - broken down by syllable] bronco [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: game [natural native speed]
Braden: a sporting event or competition; a leisure activity
Natalie: game [slowly - broken down by syllable] game [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: married [natural native speed]
Braden: united in marriage
Natalie: married [slowly - broken down by syllable] married [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: date [natural native speed]
Braden: romantic activity with a person, person to do romantic activities with
Natalie: date [slowly - broken down by syllable] date [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: rest [natural native speed]
Braden: to stop doing an activity
Natalie: rest [slowly - broken down by syllable] rest [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: spoke [natural native speed]
Braden: have something said in order to convey information
Natalie: spoke [slowly - broken down by syllable] spoke [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: inviting [natural native speed]
Braden: making a polite, formal, or friendly request to go somewhere or do something
Natalie: inviting [slowly - broken down by syllable] inviting [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: member [natural native speed]
Braden: an individual, thing or organization belonging to a group
Natalie: member [slowly - broken down by syllable] member [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Natalie: football [natural native speed]
Braden: a form of team game played in North America
Natalie: football [slowly - broken down by syllable] football [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natalie: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "days off."
Braden: The phrase “day off" or in this case "days off,” is referring to a type of vacation.
Natalie: Usually, this vacation is from work or school on what would normally be a day you would need to go to work or to school.
Braden: Most people work from Monday through Friday and have weekends as their “days off.” However, many people work on the weekends and then have days during the week as their “days off.”
Natalie: Often, when you're planning a party with your friends or an event with your family you will need to check on the “days off” of everyone involved so that as many people can come as possible.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) days off
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) days off
Braden: Perfect! What’s next?
Natalie: Our next phrase is "a date."
Braden: In English, a “date” is simply the day of the month specified by some kind of a number. For example, “the first.”
Natalie: However, in this awkward dialogue, the phrase “a date” was used in a different sense.
Braden: That's right. It was used to mean “a social or romantic engagement.” This is why Sarah mentioned that she was married.
Natalie: Beyond this, the phrase “a date” can also refer to the person who has this kind of a social or romantic engagement.
Braden: For example, "She's is my date." to mean "she is the person I have a social or romantic engagement with."
Natalie: But remember the "romantic" connotation is quite strong so be careful with this one.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Natalie: (slowly) a date
Braden: And one time fast?
Natalie: (fast) a date
Braden: Excellent! Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Natalie, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Natalie: The focus of this lesson is the future form of verbs.
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase
Natalie: One of our days off is going to be in Denver.
Braden: Okay, so, In English, there are many ways to talk about the future.
Natalie: Because of this, many English learners find it difficult to speak about the future.
Braden: That's right. In this lesson, we'll talk about the differences between the main future forms in English.
Natalie: The first form we'll look at is the “will” form. This is probably the most common future form in English.
Braden: You would use this form when you are volunteering to do something or talking about something you've just decided to do.
Natalie: For example, suppose your teacher says to you, “I need someone to help me.”
Braden: You could answer by saying, “I'll do it.” (I will do it.)
Natalie: Next, we get the “going to” form. This form is also very commonly spoken English.
Braden: You use the “going to” form when you're talking about something that is already decided.
Natalie: For example, suppose a friend of yours asks, “Have you registered for the drivers training course yet?”
Braden: You could easily respond with “Not yet. I'm going to register next week.”
Natalie: Next, let's look at the "present continuous" form. This form is used when you're talking about something in the future that has already been arranged.
Braden: For example, suppose your friend says to you, “Do you want to play soccer tonight?”
Natalie: You could easily respond with, “Sorry, I can't. I'm working.”
Braden: Last, we look at the “present simple” form. This form is used when you're talking about a schedule, timetable or about a program.
Natalie: Typical types of schedules, timetables, or programs would be a TV channel guide, a flight departures list, or the program for a meeting or concert.
Braden: For example, suppose your good friend says to you, “What time does the second act start?”
Natalie: You can easily respond with “It starts at eight-fifteen."
Braden: That's right. Notice how the verb is in the present tense but you're talking about the future.
Natalie: Right. Let's review this lesson.
Braden: In English, there are many different types of future tense forms. Because of this, it can sometimes be difficult to know which future form to use.
Natalie: So, our tips are - first - to use the “will” form when you're volunteering for something or when you just decided about doing something.
Braden: Second, to use the “going to” form when you're talking about something that is already decided.
Natalie: Third, use the “present continuous” form when you're talking about something in the future that has already been arranged.
Braden: And forth, use the “principal” form when you're talking about a schedule, timetable, or program.
Braden: That just about does it for this lesson.

Outro

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Hello EnglishClass101.com listeners! The situation in the dialog was a bit awkward. Has it ever happened to you?