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Lesson Transcript

Hi, everyone, I’m Parris from EnglishClass101.com. In this video, we’ll be talking about How to Ask and Give Directions. Let’s begin!
The first phrase is ...
[Normal] "Where is the ~?" [Slow] "Where is the ~?"
For example, you can say "Where is the bank?"
This can be used to ask for a general location or detailed directions. Don't be surprised if you only receive basic information, for example, "next to the grocery store."
The next phrase is ...
[Normal] "I need to go to the ~." [Slow] "I need to go to the ~."
For example, you can say "I need to go to the police station."
The word "need" is used, but this is used for non-emergencies as well.
Then we have...
[Normal] "How do I get to the ~?" [Slow] "How do I get to the ~?"
For example, you can say "How do I get to the museum?"
This question can be used to ask for step-by-step directions instead of a general location.
The next phrase is ...
[Normal] "Is there a ~ near here?" [Slow] "Is there a ~ near here?"
For example, you can say "Is there a library near here?"
If you're unfamiliar with an area, you can ask this to get information about a specific place you want to go.
Next phrase is ...
[Normal] "Excuse me, do you know where the ~ is?" [Slow] "Excuse me, do you know where the ~ is?"
For example, you can say "Excuse me, do you know where the park is?"
Only use "excuse me" when starting a conversation with a stranger. You would not use it with your friends or family.
Another common phrase is ...
[Normal] "Is the ~ far from here?" [Slow] "Is the ~ far from here?"
For example, you can say "Is the post office far from here?"
This is an indirect way to ask for directions. People will tell you how far the place is and probably tell you the best way to go there (e.g. walking, driving, taking a bus).
Now let’s take a look at expressions to give directions!
[Normal] "turn left" [Slow] "turn left"
For example, you can say "Turn left after two blocks."
This gives you information about how far you should go before you make any changes. In this case, you should go left.
[Normal] "turn right" [Slow] "turn right"
For example, you can say "Turn right at the third traffic light."
This also gives you information about how far you should go before taking another action. In this case, you should go right.
[Normal] "go straight" [Slow] "go straight"
This simply tells you to go in one direction, but it also implies that if you keep going straight that you will eventually find what you're looking for.
[Normal] "go past" [Slow] "go past"
For example, you can say "Go past the church."
Sometimes, when giving directions, people will give "landmarks" to let you know you're going the right way. A "landmark" is just an easily noticeable place, for example, a movie theater or restaurant.
[Normal] "at the corner of" [Slow] "at the corner of"
For example, you can say "It's at the corner of 5th Avenue and Jefferson Boulevard."
This means that a place is located at the corner, usually where two streets meet.
[Normal] "in front of" [Slow] "in front of"
For example, you can say "The bus station is in front of the supermarket."
We use "front" to refer to the main entrance of a building. It can also mean "visible from the front" and doesn't necessarily mean it's directly in front of something.
[Normal] "behind" [Slow] "behind"
For example, you can say "The parking lot is behind the movie theater."
We use "behind" to say that something is at the rear of a building. The front of a building is its main entrance, so which side is facing the street is not really important.
[Normal] "next to" [Slow] "next to"
For example, you can say "The restaurant is next to the park."
This is an example of using a non-specific location to give general directions. "Next to" can be anywhere beside, in front of, or around a place.
[Normal] "between" [Slow] "between"
For example, you can say "The store is between the coffee shop and the pet store."
Between is used with two other places. When using "between," the main place will always be in the middle of the two other places.
[Normal] "opposite" [Slow] "opposite"
For example, you can say "It's on the opposite side of the street."
Some people also say "the other side of the street."
[Normal] "It's next to ~." [Slow] "It's next to ~."
For example, you can say "It's next to the school."
This is an example of a non-specific location. "Next to" can be anywhere beside, in front of, or around a place.
Okay, that's all for this lesson. Which phrase do you like the most? Leave us a comment letting us know.
See you next time!

26 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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Which word or phrase do you like the most?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 12:15 PM
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Hello Jhonny,


So you like the question "Is it far from here?" 👍👍👍


Thanks for sharing!


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Jhonny
Friday at 11:19 AM
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I like the most... is there...far from here?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 01:31 PM
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Hi there Pheng,


Thanks for commenting. You seem to be quite the student and I'm happy to know you're finding EnglishClass101 so useful, and I wish you the best in your studies.


If you ever have any questions throughout your studies, please feel free to ask us along the way.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

PHENG TRAYMANY
Wednesday at 02:58 AM
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The phrase that i like the most is Go straight

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:14 AM
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Hello Mohamed,


Thank you for your question!! It's always great to interact with our students. ❤️️


The term "go past" means 'move past something or somewhere.' An example how to use this is - "We go past the statue on the way to school everyday."


The term "next to" means 'beside.' You can use it like this - "The bank is next to the Chinese restaurant in town."


I hope this is helpful to you.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClas101.com

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 07:24 PM
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Hello Mojgan,


Thanks for taking the time to post.👍


Please stay tuned, as we’re always updating new content on our website!😄❤️️


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

mojgan
Friday at 12:24 PM
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👍

Mohamed
Thursday at 09:08 AM
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Hi,

thanks for your lesson. I just don't understand what "go past" mean. can you please explain it to me. also, "next to" means beside or near?

Thank you

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:34 AM
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Hello Ventsislav and Nouman,


Thank you for posting. If you ever have any questions, please let us know. 😉


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Nouman Ahmad
Monday at 06:41 PM
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I really like the Macdonald is next to your home😁