Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi, from New York! This is Sadia.
Keith: Hey, and I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English Lesson number 1 - “Where Did You Learn to Speak English like That?!” Sadia, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Sadia: Well, in this lesson we’ll learn about basic greetings,
asking about someone's well being, and asking simple
questions.
Keith: OK, and this conversation takes place...
Sadia: It takes place on a Tuesday night on the
telephone.
Keith: And this conversation is between...
Sadia: a student and his teacher.
Keith: Alright, well let’s listen in to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Zo: Good evening, Ms. Walsh. How are you?
Ms. Walsh: Good. And you? How are you, Zo?
Zo: I'm great! I just wanted to make sure you were in your
office so I can stop by for the homework; I'm going on
my big trip tomorrow!
Ms. Walsh: Ah, yes! Is tomorrow Wednesday?
Zo: Yep, tomorrow is Wednesday.
Ms. Walsh: How nice! Well, I'm going home now, but I'll leave the
homework with the secretary. Have a great trip!
Zo: Thank you, Ms. Walsh! See you later!
Keith: One more time slowly.
Zo: Good evening, Ms. Walsh. How are you?
Ms. Walsh: Good. And you? How are you, Zo?
Zo: I'm great! I just wanted to make sure you were in your
office so I can stop by for the homework; I'm going on
my big trip tomorrow!
Ms. Walsh: Ah, yes! Is tomorrow Wednesday?
Zo: Yep, tomorrow is Wednesday.
Ms. Walsh: How nice! Well, I'm going home now, but I'll leave the
homework with the secretary. Have a great trip!
Zo: Thank you, Ms. Walsh! See you later!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: Okay. So the main character, Zo, has called his
teacher to let her know that he won't be in class today.
Keith: That's right! He's going on a big trip-- and he seems
really excited about it!
Sadia: Yeah, he does! What's even better, though, it’s a little bit weird, is that his
teacher even seems excited about it!
Keith: Actually, yeah! That is a bit weird, and it’s kind of surprising! I mean, that’s a really, really nice teacher. I'm not sure I've ever had a teacher that
friendly!
Sadia: Really? I feel like I've had one or two.
Keith: Not me! I mean, in high school, if I were to tell
one of my teachers that I was going on some big trip,
they would've been like, “Hey, you’ve got to do three weeks of homework in advance, and they would be upset that I’m missing class. Not so happy for me.
Sadia: yeah, Yeah, Yeah. Really? Well, not all teachers are
that way, actually.
Keith: Yeah, I guess so.
Sadia: I mean, Zo’s teacher seems happy. Zo
says, "I just wanted to make sure you were in your
office so I can stop by for the homework."
Keith: Oh, that's right. Actually there’s a couple of good phrases in
that sentence.
Sadia: Yeah, I think the first is, "to make sure," which
means “to see” or “to be sure”.
Keith: Right. As in, "I just wanted to see if you were in your
office."
Sadia: Exactly.
Keith: The second important phrase that I thought was, "stop by."
Sadia: Oh, right, right. “Stop by”. What does this mean?
Keith: To "stop by" means to visit someone for a short time.
For example, "I'm going to stop by the store on my
way home."
Sadia: Right, right. “Stop by.” So Zo has called his teacher to see if she is in her
office so he can stop by.
Keith: Well, how about we “stop by” and take a look at some vocabulary.
Sadia: OK, let’s.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we shall see is...
Sadia: yes [natural native speed]
Keith: used to express agreement
Sadia: yes [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: yes [natural native speed]
Next:"
you [natural native speed]
Keith: the one(s) being spoken to
you [slowly - broken down by syllable]
you [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: great [natural native speed]
Keith: large or very good; in a large or very good manner
Sadia: great [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: great [natural native speed]
Next:"
good [natural native speed]
Keith: positive in nature; not bad or poor
good [slowly - broken down by syllable]
good [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: tomorrow [natural native speed]
Keith: the day after today
Sadia: tomorrow [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: tomorrow [natural native speed]
Next:"
Wednesday [natural native speed]
Keith: the fourth day of the week
Wednesday [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Wednesday [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: trip [natural native speed]
Keith: a journey from one place to another
Sadia: trip [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: trip [natural native speed]
Next:"
secretary [natural native speed]
Keith: office worker
secretary [slowly - broken down by syllable]
secretary [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: homework [natural native speed]
Keith: school work that is done at home
Sadia: homework [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: homework [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: OK, let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases for this lesson.
Sadia: The first phrase we’ll look at is, “Good evening.”
Keith: Oh, yeah. Zo, he opens the conversation with a greeting.
He says, "Good evening." because he's talking to Ms. Walsh at night time.
Sadia: Right.
Keith: Most conversations begin with a greeting, and greetings are a nice way to break the ice. And, Sadia, what does that mean, to “break the ice”?
Sadia: Ah, “break the ice” is a great phrase. “Break the ice” means to start a conversation.
Keith: Right, so if we’re meeting for the first time,
Sadia: Mm-hmm.
Keith: We’re going to “break the ice” with a greeting.
Sadia: Right, exactly.
Keith: And the particular greeting you use depends on the time of day.
Sadia: Right, so when I saw you earlier today, I said, "Good morning!"
Keith: You did! And when I get my lunch from the deli, I always greet the owner with, "Good afternoon!"
Sadia: Right, so in the dialogue, Zo says to his teacher, “Good evening” because he’s talking to her in the evening time.
Keith: Right, at night.
Sadia: Right. So greetings make for really nice conversation. It shows the person you're talking to that you're interested in talking to them-- that you're a great person to talk to!
Keith: Right!
Keith: I hope so.
Sadia: Like, yes. “Good night, now.”
Keith: Oh, wow! Well, what's the next phrase we’re going to take a look at??
Sadia: The next phrase is, "how nice!"
Keith: Ah, yes. So, when Zo reminds his teacher that he's going on this big trip, his teacher says, “how nice!”
Sadia: Lovely woman, she is! "How nice!" “How nice” is a great phrase. “How nice” shows happiness-- it shows that you're happy for the person you're talking to. In this case, the teacher, Ms. Walsh, is happy for Zo-- she’s happy that he's going on a little adventure!
Keith: Right, so if it’s something good that’s happening for someone else, you say, “How nice.”
Sadia: Exactly.
Keith: So Sadia, if you were getting married, I would say, “How nice!”
Sadia: You would? Let’s see if that ever comes to pass.
Keith: Let’s hope so soon, right. So the next phrase we’re going to take a look at is, "Have a
great trip!"
Sadia: Ah, my favorite!
Keith: Why is that your favorite?
Sadia: I love to travel. I love to travel, so “Have a great trip” is music to my ears. I love hearing, “Have a great trip.” So when someone tells you they’re going on a trip, it's nice to say to them, "have a great trip!"
Keith: OK, well, how about saying, "have a good trip?"
Sadia: Eh, “have a good trip..” that’s okay, too, but it just doesn't have the same power-- It doesn’t have the same feeling-- that "have a GREAT trip" has!
Keith: That's so true. So, good is good, and great is even better!
Sadia: That's right! Great job, Keith!

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus of this lesson is affirmative sentences.
Keith: In this dialogue, Ms. Walsh asks, "Is tomorrow
Wednesday?"
Sadia: That's right-- "Is tomorrow Wednesday?" She asks a
simple question about the day of the week.
Keith: Right. Questions. Very important to conversations.
Sadia: Ah, they are. So, Ms. Walsh asks, "Is tomorrow
Wednesday?" and Zo answers, "Yep. Tomorrow is
Wednesday."
Keith: That's right. He's AFFIRMING that tomorrow is in
fact Wednesday.
Keith: When someone asks you a question, you can create
an affirmative answer by opening with "yes," (or in
this case, in the dialogue, what Zo used, was the more casual "yep") and a form of the
verb “to be”.
Sadia: That's right. So one more time, you can make an affirmative statement, or say yes, by opening with “yes” and a form of the verb “to be.” So if I ask, "Are you going to the party tonight?" You could say...
Keith: Yes, I am.
Sadia: How about, "Will you be in class tomorrow?"
Keith: Yes, I will.
Sadia: Were you at the game last night?
Keith: Yes, I was.
Sadia: Perfect.
Keith: And you can make informal affirmative sentences by simply using "yes," or more casual forms of "yes," like, "yeah," "sure," "yep," or "absolutely." So,
Sadia:, if I ask you, "Are you going to the party tonight?" How could you answer casually?
Sadia: I could say, “Absolutely!”
Keith: And if I ask, "Will you be in class tomorrow?"
Sadia: I could answer, "Yep."
Keith: And what about, "Were you at the game last night?"
Sadia: Yeah. Or, I could say, “Yeah, I was”.
Keith: So, that was answering in casual affirmative sentences.
Sadia: Yep!
Keith: So answering in the affirmative, giving a positive answer, a “yes” answer, is easy.
Sadia: Yes, it is.

Outro

Keith: Yep! Alright, well that’s going to do it for this lesson. Thanks for listening.
Sadia. Thanks for listening. Bye-bye.

Grammar

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61 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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How did you like this lesson?

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Friday at 2:29 am
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Dear Linda and Masoomeh,


Thank you for posting. We are very happy to hear you enjoy learning English with us. ❤️️

If you have any questions, please let us know.


Best regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Masoomeh
Wednesday at 10:48 pm
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This is wonderful to learn English

Thank you so much ❤

Linda
Thursday at 1:48 pm
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GOOD

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Monday at 1:33 pm
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Hi Demian Ulisses,


Thank you for leaving a comment and let us know if you have any questions!


Sincerely,


Khanh

Team EnglishClass101.com

Demian Ulisses
Saturday at 10:14 am
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Question: "Do you enjoy studying English?"

Answer: yes, I love studying english

Question: "Is your English good?"

Answer: not, I not Yet

Question: "Will you study English for a long time?"

Answer: i will study very time yet

Teng
Tuesday at 8:15 pm
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Hello Teacher

I would like this lession "Stop By!" and Please "Stop By!"


Best Wish

Teng

EnglishClass101.com
Saturday at 10:32 pm
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Hello Linda,


Thankyou for your post!


Please let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Linda
Thursday at 9:56 pm
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Thanks

EnglishClass101.com
Saturday at 10:28 am
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Hello Sang,


Thankyou for posting in our comments sections. 😄


This is abit tricky, some people say the first day of the week is a Monday, some say it's a Sunday. Most commonly, Monday is the first day of the week, although sometimes in the US, Canada and Japan its counted as the second day of the week.


You often experience this in various calendars.


Sincerely,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

sang vo
Sunday at 11:48 am
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Hi teachers,

In vocabulary section, I saw an explanation of Wednesday "is the fourth day of the week". This could be a mistake . It should be the third day of the week. There are 7 days in a week. 1st is Mon, 2nd is Tue, Wed is 3rd... 😎