Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi everyone, this is Sadia coming to you from New York.
Keith: Hey, and I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English Lesson 10 - “How to Stay in Style While in America”
Sadia: In our last lesson, Lesson 9 - , you learned about shopping at a convenience store
Keith: And we talked about counters, such as, one bottle of water.
Sadia: We also talked about the phrase, “What is that?”
Keith: And with that phrase, “What is that?” we talked about demonstrative pronouns.
Sadia: Right, so this, that, these, and those.
Keith: In this lesson you’re going to learn how to check into
a hotel and also how to make requests.
Sadia: This conversation takes place at a hotel front desk.
Keith: And the conversation is between the main character, Zo, and
the front desk worker at a hotel. Alright, well let’s listen in to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Front Desk Worker: Welcome to the L Hotel!
Zo: Hello. I have a reservation.
Front: Desk Worker Your name, please.
Zo: Zo Viljoen.
Front Desk Worker: Spell it, please.
Zo: V-I-L-J-O-E-N.
Front Desk Worker: Ah, yes. Mr. Viljoen, you’re in room number 515.
Here's the key.
Zo: Is there Internet in the room?
Front Desk Worker: Yes, there’s complimentary wireless Internet.
Zo: And are there toiletries?
Front Desk Worker: Yes, sir.
Zo: Thank you. Oh, and a wake up call, please.
Front Desk Worker: Of course. What time?
Zo: 7 a.m., please. What time is breakfast?
Front desk From 6 am to 7:30 am on the first floor in the dining room.
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Front Desk Worker: Welcome to the L Hotel!
Zo: Hello. I have a reservation.
Front: Desk Worker Your name, please.
Zo: Zo Viljoen.
Front Desk Worker: Spell it, please.
Zo: V-I-L-J-O-E-N.
Front Desk Worker: Ah, yes. Mr. Viljoen, you’re in room number 515.
Here's the key.
Zo: Is there Internet in the room?
Front Desk Worker: Yes, there’s complimentary wireless Internet.
Zo: And are there toiletries?
Front Desk Worker: Yes, sir.
Zo: Thank you. Oh, and a wake up call, please.
Front Desk Worker: Of course. What time?
Zo: 7 a.m., please. What time is breakfast?
Front desk From 6 am to 7:30 am on the first floor in the dining room.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: Zo has finally arrived in New York and,
after a "pit stop" or quick stop at a nearby convenience store, he finally gets to the hotel he'll be staying at. It seems like a pretty nice place; the
front desk worker is quite serious and answers all of
Zo's questions quickly but very professionally and very politely. So of course New York has kind of every sort of hotel you can imagine, right?
Keith: So you can pay hundreds and hundreds of dollars, or maybe even thousands and thousands of dollars.
Sadia: Yeah.
Keith: For a really, really stylish, really cool hotel room that’s located right in the middle of Manhattan where no detail is left unattended, and everything you want, they’ll give it to you, and they’ll smile and, you know, be on their knees and anything you want.
Sadia: Exactly. Very nice, or--the conjunction “or”-- you can pay under $50 for a bed in a hostel
room that you share with other young travelers who don’t have a lot of money to spend. There seems to be something for everyone, I think! I’m actually I'm really a huge fan of
hotels-- I love hotels.
Keith: Well, it’s probably because of the service, right? Are you going to like the hundreds and hundreds of dollars hotels?
Sadia: Maybe hundreds, but not hundreds and hundreds.
Keith: Just one hundred.
Sadia: That’s because I have a very kind boyfriend. But it’s not really the service I like. I’m a little neurotic.
Keith: What’s that mean?
Sadia: Which...
Keith: Neurotic?
Sadia: It means, kind of, very, a little too focused on small things, most of which don’t matter, in my case. So I like hotels because, you know, the bed I think is my favorite part because it’s all freshly made, the sheets are ironed sometimes. and it’s just perfection.
Keith: Usually in your home, are you concerned with that detail? Are you always thinking about, my bed, it has to be perfect.
Sadia: That’s the funny thing. Not really. I’m always on one side of the extreme, so either the bed is totally disheveled and looks crazy, like a mad person sleeps there, or it’s nice and..
Keith: Super, super clean.
Sadia: Yeah, one or the other, never, never in between.
Keith: But hotels are, you’re always going to get the nice one. Unless you go to the really cheap place.
Sadia: Even the cheap places though, I feel like they kind of pay attention to the bed.
Keith: Probably better than me. OK, well let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we shall see is...
Sadia: reservation [natural native speed]
Keith: an arrangement to have something (such as a hotel
room) held for one's use
Sadia: reservation [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: reservation [natural native speed]
Next:"
to spell [natural native speed]
Keith: to name the letters of a word in order
to spell [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to spell [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: room [natural native speed]
Keith: a sectioned off part of the inside of a building
Sadia: room [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: room [natural native speed]
Next:"
key [natural native speed]
Keith: tool used to open a lock, usually on a door
key [slowly - broken down by syllable]
key [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: Internet [natural native speed]
Keith: an electronic communication network
Sadia: Internet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: Internet [natural native speed]
Next:"
in [natural native speed]
Keith: shows inclusion, location or position
in [slowly - broken down by syllable]
in [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: LAN cable [natural native speed]
Keith: local area network (LAN) cord used to connect to other
computers or the Internet
Sadia: LAN cable [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: LAN cable [natural native speed]
Next:"
towel [natural native speed]
Keith: a cloth used for wiping or drying
towel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
towel [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: wake-up call [natural native speed]
Keith: a telephone call intended to wake a sleeper; common at
hotels
Sadia: wake-up call [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: wake-up call [natural native speed]
Next:"
A.M. [natural native speed]
Keith: short for ante meridian, or before noon; morning time
A.M. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
A.M. [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: time [natural native speed]
Keith: a moment, hour, day or year
Sadia: time [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: time [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: breakfast [natural native speed]
Keith: the first meal of the day; the morning meal
Sadia: breakfast [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: breakfast [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: OK, well, let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: The first phrase we’ll look at is, “I have....”
Keith: The verb "to have" indicates possession.
Sadia: Zo "has" a reservation-- he says, "I have a
reservation." Which means what?
Keith: It means he made arrangements to stay at the hotel in
advance. So he called before and he said, “Can I have a room?” Use "have" when you want to show that you possess or own something. For example, "I have three
brothers."
Sadia: "I have many friends," or "I have no time." So “have” shows possession.
Keith: Or if you don’t have something.
Sadia: “I don’t have many friends” or “I don’t have time.”
Keith: Our next phrase is, “Your name, please.” After Zo tells the front desk worker-- or, receptionist-- that he has a reservation, the worker says, "Name, please."
Sadia: That’s short for, "Tell me your name, "please." If you recall, this sentence, “Name, please,” uses an IMPLIED VERB-- the verb TELL isn't stated, but SUGGESTED.
Keith: What’s next?
Sadia: Next is, “Spell it, please.”
Keith: After Zo gives his name, the front desk worker says, "Spell it, please." This is short for, "Spell your name, please."
Sadia: The worker probably has to enter Zo's name into the hotel computer and she wants to be sure she's spelling it correctly so the reservation is fast and it’s efficient. So she says,
Keith:“Spell it, please.” The next phrase is, “in the room”
Sadia: Zo asks if there's Internet "in the room."
Keith: And what that means is he wants to know if he can connect to the Internet within the walls of the room he has been assigned, or he wants to be sure that he doesn't have to leave his room to get on the Internet.
Sadia: So he asks, "Is there Internet in the room?" The next phrase is, “7 am, please.” Zo would like his wake-up call at 7 in the morning, So he uses the shortened phrase, "7 am, please." This is another business transaction or communication that is expected to go smoothly
and to go quickly. So just as in the other dialogues, there are a lot of short phrases in this
conversation!
Keith: Just like with the customs official, and there is no time for politeness or nice conversation!
Sadia: No time at all. They have to go fast, so everything is shortened. The next phrase is, “Of course.”
Keith: This is a useful phrase that means, "naturally," or "without question."
Sadia: Exactly. So when Zo requests a wake-up call, the front desk worker says, "Of course."
Keith: And the worker is used to filling requests for wake-up calls and Zo will receive his wake-up call without question--
Sadia: Right. There is no doubt that he will receive a wake-up call. "Of course." The last phrase we'll look at is, “What time is breakfast?”
Keith: Zo asks when breakfast will be served by saying, "What time is breakfast?" This phrase is easily adaptable to other situations.
Sadia: You're right-- it is pretty useful. To use this phrase, simply say, "What time is, and the event?" So I could say,"What time is dinner?"
Keith: Or "What time is the party?"

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus points of this lesson are simple interrogative sentences using "is oe are there..."
Keith: and (more) Prepositions!
Sadia: But first, let's look at SIMPLE INTERROGATIVE SENTENCES using IS THERE and ARE THERE.
Keith: OK.
Sadia: As Zo is confirming, making sure that he has a reservation, as he’s doing that with the front desk worker, he wants to know if he can get onto the Internet from his room. He makes an interrogative sentence and says, "Istthere Internet in the room?"
Keith: Zo also asks if there are toiletries (and toiletries means toothpaste, soap, shampoo, things you use in the bathroom) by asking, "Are there toiletries?"
Sadia: So, interrogative sentences are questions.
Keith: That’s right. And as you can see, "is there?" That’s used for SINGULAR nouns, that means one noun, and "are there?" that’s for PLURAL nouns. So some examples would be IS THERE a show tonight? Or even, IS THERE anything I can do?
Sadia: Right or, IS THERE something wrong? IS THERE another chair? And don't forget-- "Are there" is for PLURAL NOUNS. So, ARE THERE any tables left? Or, uh, ARE THERE more people coming?
Keith: ARE THERE good restaurants in that neighborhood? ARE THERE many more Gengo English lessons? Let’s move on. What’s next.
Sadia: Next is PREPOSITIONS! Again!
Keith: Well, we've talked about prepositions in previous lessons, in older lessons but you can never review them too much!
Sadia: If you remember, prepositions words that link nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence.
Keith: In this dialogue, there's, "Welcome to The L Hotel!"
Sadia: “Welcome to the L Hotel.” It links “welcome” with “the hotel.” And-- a sentence we just covered, "Is there Internet in the room?"
Keith: "Is there Internet in the room?" And also there's, "From 6 a.m. to 7:30 a.m.”
Sadia: “6 a.m. to 7:30 a.m.” So prepositions, they’re everywhere!
Keith: They are!
Sadia: And remember - prepositions link nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence.
Keith: And some examples ARE in, on, at, to, from, and also with,
Sadia: Right. And how about against, on, under, throughout-- "The boy pressed his face AGAINST the glass of the candy store window." Or uh, "The files are ON my desk."
Keith: "The dog is sleeping UNDER the bed."
Sadia: "Don't talk DURING class"
Keith: Review past lessons to brush up on the prepositions.
Sadia: Of course, and you know we'll be revisiting them again.
Keith: Yeah, both are very important.
Sadia: Yes they are.

Outro

Keith: OK, well, Thanks for listening.
Sadia: Bye-bye. Thanks for listening.

7 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Have you ever stayed at a hotel in America, or another English-speaking country?

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 1:00 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Kyle,


Thanks for the question!


Are you asking what some questions are which you might need checking in to a hotel?


I can suggest a couple here:


"Can I please check in? My booking is under the name ......"

"Is breakfast included in the price of the room?"

"Do you have WIFI in your hotel?"

"Is there any public transport available close by?"


I hope this if helpful to you.

Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Kyle Chen
Sunday at 11:14 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Is there any question about check in hotel ? Like free shuttle bus to downtown or breakfast price or benefit of hotel member.

EnglishClass101.com
Sunday at 11:40 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Almita,


Thanks for taking the time to post and welcome all the way from Bangladesh!


Glad you are enjoying the lessons!


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Almita Moon
Monday at 11:21 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I live in Bangladesh. I am learning English. I am very fond of your lessons. Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to learn English.

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Friday at 10:48 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Sang,


Thank you for posting. Have you ever stayed at a hotel? To say you have "never... not" done something is a double-negative and, like in math, two negatives make a positive statement, changing your sentence meaning to "I have stayed at a hotel." If you haven't, then it would be either "I have not stayed at a hotel before." or "I have never stayed at a hotel." Hope this helps you express yourself in future English conversations well. 😉


Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,


Patricia

Team EnglishClass101.com

sang
Friday at 4:12 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I m never has not stayed at a hotel