Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hello, everyone. Thanks for tuning in. This is Sadia.
Keith: Hi, and I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English, Lesson 2 - “How to make a Good First Impression.” Alright, so Sadia, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Sadia: In this lesson you’ll learn how to introduce yourself
and make new friends.
Keith. Right. This conversation takes place on a Wednesday flight,
just after boarding.
Sadia: The conversation is between the main character, Zo, and
the person sitting next to him.
Keith: Alright, well let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Michelle: (humming a pop song)
Zo: Excuse me. May I pass you? My seat is next to yours.
Michelle: Oh, sorry! Go ahead, please.
Zo: Hello. How are you? I'm Zo.
Michelle: Hi! Nice to meet you. I'm Michelle.
Zo: I'm sorry. Your name again, please. Slowly.
Michelle: Michelle.
Zo: Michelle.
Michelle: That's it. But please call me Shelly.
Zo: Shelly. Nice to meet you.
Michelle: Nice to meet you too.
Keith: One more time slowly.
Michelle: (humming a pop song)
Zo: Excuse me. May I pass you? My seat is next to yours.
Michelle: Oh, sorry! Go ahead, please.
Zo: Hello. How are you? I'm Zo.
Michelle: Hi! Nice to meet you. I'm Michelle.
Zo: I'm sorry. Your name again, please. Slowly.
Michelle: Michelle.
Zo: Michelle.
Michelle: That's it. But please call me Shelly.
Zo: Shelly. Nice to meet you.
Michelle: Nice to meet you too.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: Alright, so even though Zo and Michelle are meeting for the first
time, their conversation sounds pretty casual-- it's pretty
informal.
Keith: Yes, that’s right. I think it's a very casual conversation.
Sadia: Yeah, so I’m thinking they’re probably around the same age,
which brings them closer together even though that, for now
they’re complete strangers.
Keith: Definitely. They don’t know each other, but they’re using casual language, probably because they’re close in age.
Sadia: Mm-hmm.
Keith: So notice that Michelle has given Zo, whom
she has never met, a stranger, permission to call her by
her nickname. In some cultures, only family and close friends use nicknames.
Sadia: Right. But in America, for some reason, I’m not really sure why. It's not uncommon for some people to be known only by their nicknames.
Keith: That’s right. Some people, they have a real name, but I don’t know their real name. I just know their nickname.
Sadia: Yeah, exactly, and there are some funny ones too, like Bubba and Jimbo.
Keith: I like them, they’re fun.
Sadia: Ha, ha.
Keith: Fun nicknames.
Sadia: Do you have a nickname?
Keith: Me? Now, but you know what, I always wanted one. I always feel like it would be a lot of fun to have a nickname.
Sadia: Yeah, I agree, I agree.
Keith: But how about yourself? Do you have a nickname?
Sadia: Well, not really, I mean...
Keith: You do have one, but you don’t want to tell us!
Sadia: Well, some family and some friends tried to
experiment with a nickname, but didn’t really stick.
Keith: What does that mean? “To stick”?
Sadia: “To stick” means “to stay” or “to last,” so when I say my nickname never really stuck, or it didn’t stick, that means that, you know, it didn’t last a very long time.
Keith: Well, why? Is it embarrassing? Is that what it was?
Sadia: Let’s just say that I don't think I could have gone through
my adult life being called, "Poochie."
Keith: Poochie?! That’s really cute. I like it a lot, actually.
Sadia: Really? Well maybe I should reconsider!
Keith: Well maybe I should call you Poochie from now own.
Sadia: Oh, boy.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: OK, let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is...
Sadia: seat [natural native speed]
Keith: a place for sitting, a thing on which to sit
Sadia: seat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: seat [natural native speed]
Next:"
next [natural native speed]
Keith: immediately following, adjacent, future
next [slowly - broken down by syllable]
next [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: your [natural native speed]
Keith: belonging to you
Sadia: your [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: your [natural native speed]
Next:"
name [natural native speed]
Keith: word or phrase referring to a person or thing
name [slowly - broken down by syllable]
name [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: slowly [natural native speed]
Keith: without speed or in a slow manner
Sadia: slowly [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: slowly [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: me [natural native speed]
Keith: myself [direct object]
Sadia: me [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: me [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: OK. The first phrase we’ll look at is, “Excuse me.”
Keith: "Excuse me," and this of course a very, very useful phrase.
Sadia: Mm-hmm.
Keith: It's typically used
when you want to pass someone and when they’re in your way, or when you want to get someone's attention.
Sadia: Right. So for example, I was walking through Bryant Park the
other day. I was exhausted. I was running around, I had done a lot of shopping. And I spotted a woman who was sitting on a bench by herself, so I thought I need to sit down.
Keith: I want to sit down.
Said: I WANT to sit down, so I walked over to her and I said, "Excuse me-- is anyone sitting here?"
Keith: Or, you also could say something else, right?
Sadia: I could’ve also asked, "Excuse me-- do you mind if I sit here?"
Keith: Right, and I think that’s a very good phrase. We’re in New York, and we ride the subway pretty often.
Sadia: Ahh yes.
Keith: But sometimes people take up a lot of space, a lot of room. So if you want to sit, you can say, “Excuse me.”
Sadia: Exactly. “Excuse me” is particularly helpful during rush hour.
Keith: That’s right. In this dialogue, Zo, she says, "Excuse me." He and his new friend Michelle are on a plane-- and probably Michelle is sitting on the outside, and Zo has to go inside. So he says, "Excuse me." So he can sit down.
Sadia: Right. Excuse me.
Keith: OK, so the second phrase that we’re going to take a look at is, "I'm sorry..."
Sadia: So Zo doesn't understand Michelle when she tells him her name, so he asks her to repeat it by saying, "I'm sorry, your name again?"
Keith: It sounds like he's apologizing, though. He’s saying, “I’m sorry, I did something wrong.” Why?
Sadia: Well, he is, really apologizing. He's sort of saying, "I'm sorry to have to ask you to repeat yourself, but could you?"
Keith: Ah, that’s right. It's a polite way of asking someone to repeat themselves.
Sadia: Right. So, "I'm sorry, could you say that again?"
Keith: Or, "I'm sorry, once more please?"
Sadia: Precisely. So, “I’m sorry” is used when you want someone to repeat themselves.

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus of this lesson is making a request or asking for something using "please."
Keith: In this dialogue, Michelle makes a request of Zo. She says, "Please call me Shelly."
Sadia: That's right. “Please call me Shelly.”
Keith: Making a request or asking for something in English is very, very simple. Say, "please," followed by your request.
Sadia: Instead of saying, “Call me when you get home,” which sounds kind of rude, really.
Keith: Yeah.
Sadia: You can say “Please call me when you get home.”
Keith: Sadia, you’re so nice. Or if your mom says, “Please don't leave your dirty dishes on the table.”
Sadia: Instead of “Don’t leave your dirty dishes on the table,” your mom is nice, and she says, “Please don’t leave your dirty dishes on the table.”
Keith: That’s very, very nice.
Sadia: Or “Please come with me to the doctor.”
Keith: Or you can also say, “Please don't do that.”
Sadia: So "please" turns a command into a polite request.
Keith: Sometimes the teachers are really mean, and they say, “Sit down!”
Sadia: But instead, they could say, “Please sit down.”
Keith: And, "Hand me that book" becomes
Sadia: Please hand me that book.
Keith: And finally, "Stop!" becomes
Sadia: Please stop.
Keith: Sadia, you get all the nice lines. I get all the mean ones.
Keith: Well, "Please" can also be placed at the end of a sentence.
As in, "I'd like two tickets, please."
Sadia: Right or, "Sit down, please."
Keith: Keep studying English, please!
Sadia: Yeah. Keep tuning in, please!
Keith: Exactly. So, making a request is very, very easy--
Sadia: It is. Just use PLEASE!

Outro

Keith: Please. Alright, well that’s going to do it for this lesson. Thanks for listening.
Sadia: Thanks for listening, Buh-bye.

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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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This Gengo English lesson is all about making a good first impression-- in other words, meeting someone and making them interested in getting to know you better! In the dialogue, Zo and the girl sitting next to him introduce themselves to one another. Will they make good first impressions and become friends? Keep listening to the lessons and find out! What are some things you do to make a good first impression?

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 9:08 pm
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Hi Sudhanshu Maurya,


Thank you so much for your kind words, we are very happy! ❤️️

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Sudhanshu Maurya
Saturday at 11:46 am
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Hi.. Dear

That is great app really really I am very impress with the help improve our communication skills thank you so much....... 🌺🌺🙃🌺🌺🌺

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 8:04 pm
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Hi Anissa,


Please check out the [Take quiz] in the [Vocabulary] tab. There are review and writing questions so you can check out your progress on each lesson. 👍


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Anissa
Saturday at 10:23 am
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Hello

I'm confused about assignment , where I answer the questions? in comments or somewhere else ? I couldn't find it

Anissa
Friday at 11:51 am
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Thanks

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 7:43 pm
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Hi Teng,


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Teng
Tuesday at 1:22 pm
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Hi Teacher

The First time, I was a little confused about Assignments in each lesson But the instructor suggested So I made a new one Now to do every new thing. Thank you for your advice.


Sincerely,

Teng

Teng
Monday at 9:06 pm
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The Gengo English lesson is all about making a good first impression for learning lesson to me. Thank for the EnglishClass101.com team.


Have a nice day.


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Hi Anbu,


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Anbu
Thursday at 5:26 am
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Thank you so much