Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi, everyone, from New York City.
Keith: The great New York. Welcome, I’m Keith, and you are...
Sadia: I’m Sadia.
Keith: Thanks again, everyone, for listening to Gengo English, Lesson 6 - “Don't Miss Your Chance! How to Close the Deal in English.”
Sadia: In the last lesson, Lesson 5 - “Welcome to New York!
Avoid Instant Immersion Shock with this Lesson,” you
learned how to talk about the time,
Keith: the date
Sadia: and the temperature!
Keith: In this lesson you’ll learn how to exchange personal
information.
Sadia: This conversation takes place in the airport, just as our main character Zo is
about to pass through customs.
Keith: OK, and the conversation is between the main character, Zo, and
his new friend, again, Michelle. I think they’re more than friends.
Sadia: Hmm.. I think they are. They need to reword that.
Keith: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Airport Announcer: Foreign passport holders this way. Foreign passport holders this way.
Zo: Well, it was nice to meet you.
Michelle: Same here.
Zo: By the way, this is my business card. This is my e-mail address, and this is my phone number.
Michelle: Oh, thanks! I have a business card too. This is my business card. Here you are. My e-mail and my cell phone number are here. E-mail me!
Zo: Okay! Thank you!
Michelle: Buh-bye! Enjoy your stay!
Zo: Thanks! Bye!
Keith: One more time, slowly.
Airport Announcer: Foreign passport holders this way. Foreign passport holders this way.
Zo: Well, it was nice to meet you.
Michelle: Same here.
Zo: By the way, this is my business card. This is my e-mail address, and this is my phone number.
Michelle: Oh, thanks! I have a business card too. This is my business card. Here you are. My e-mail and my cell phone number are here. E-mail me!
Zo: Okay! Thank you!
Michelle: Buh-bye! Enjoy your stay!
Zo: Thanks! Bye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: Alright, so, our main character, Zo, he seems to be making a lot of progress. He’s getting to know Michelle a little more.
Sadia: He is! Aren't you proud of him!
Keith: Well, I am! Especially because he seems to know what he's
doing!
Sadia: You're right! He does seem to know what he’s doing. I’ll tell you, there's nothing worse than meeting someone for the first time and they're a little bit
forceful about getting your phone number or your email
address...
Keith: A little forceful.. What’s that mean?
Sadia: It means aggressive. It means that you know, you insist on getting someone’s phone number.
Keith: Give me your phone number! [laughs]
Sadia: Exactly.
Keith: But Zo, our main character, he seems pretty smooth.
Sadia: He does seem pretty smooth. So what is the RIGHT way to get someone's information?
Keith: You know, I’m not the expert over here, but what I think is the RIGHT way to
ask for someone's information-- their phone
number, their email address,-- is to give your
own first.
Sadia: So you don’t say, you know, “Give me your email address. Give me your phone number!” You offer your information first.
Keith: What happens if you give it to them and they don’t give it back?
Sadia: If you give someone your information and they don’t give you theirs, it’s probably safe to assume that...
Keith and Sadia: they don’t want to talk to you. [laughs]
Sadia: If only EVERYONE knew this very important information.
Keith: Wow, you’ve got some, uh, bad experience, huh?
Sadia: Can you tell?
Keith: A little bit, yeah. For our listeners out there, if you a number or an email address, give yours first and just hope.
Sadia: Yes, hope.
Keith: That you’ll get something back.
Sadia: Luckily, for our main character Zo, Michelle IS interested in talking to him more.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: OK, let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is...
Sadia: foreign [natural native speed]
Keith: from outside a place or country
Sadia: foreign [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: foreign [natural native speed]
Next:"
passport [natural native speed]
Keith: document needed to leave and re-enter a country
passport [slowly - broken down by syllable]
passport [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: meet [natural native speed]
Keith: to come into contact with; to come together
Sadia: meet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: meet [natural native speed]
Next:"
email [natural native speed]
Keith: electronic mail; computer mail
email [slowly - broken down by syllable]
email [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: phone number [natural native speed]
Keith: the number used in calling a particular phone
Sadia: phone number [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: phone number [natural native speed]
Next:"
or [natural native speed]
Keith: used to show an alternative to something
or [slowly - broken down by syllable]
or [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: business card [natural native speed]
Keith: a small company card that has one's name and contact
information on it
Sadia: business card [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: business card [natural native speed]
Next:"
stay [natural native speed]
Keith: time spent in a place
stay [slowly - broken down by syllable]
stay [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: email address [natural native speed]
Keith: a location to which e-mail messages can be delivered
Sadia: email address [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: email address [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: OK, well let’s take a look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: The first phrase we’ll look at is, "Foreign passport holders this way."
Keith: That’s actually kind of advanced, but very, very useful I think. The dialogue opens with an announcer or airport worker saying, "Foreign passport holders this way." He's directing all non-US citizens-- all foreigners, or "foreign passport holders"-- to a particular place.
Sadia: “Foreign passport holders this way.” In addition to the worker announcing that all foreigners are to go a certain way, there are signs in the airport that direct non-US citizens-- or, "foreign passport holders"-- to the correct line for customs processing.
Keith: So, "foreign passport holders this way" is a phrase you should expect to hear--
Sadia: And read!
Keith: Actually, when you’re going to any airport. Not just an American airport. An airport in Japan. An airport in India. They’ll all say, “foreign passport holders this way.” Or maybe “non-country citizens.” Very useful phrase if you’re a traveler.
Sadia: Yes.
Keith: What's the second phrase, Sadia?
Sadia: As they are about to part ways-- or, separate and say goodbye-- Zo says, "Well, it was nice to meet you, Shelly!"
Keith: Just a quick reminder. Shelly was her nickname. It sounds like "well..." is a kind of introduction or something...
Sadia: It signals to the person you're speaking to that you're about to say something-- and that you're giving whatever you're about to say some thought. You're thinking as you speak. So Zo says, “Well, it was nice to meet you, Shelly.”
Keith: When you want to think a little bit while you’re talking, you can say, “Well, how about we move to the next phrase?
Sadia: What is it?
Keith: The next phrase is, "It was nice to meet you."
Sadia: A sweet phrase, no doubt. "It was nice to meet you" is a very friendly parting phrase. You can say it just before "Good-bye!"
Keith: Exactly. Zo is about to say good-bye to Michelle, so he lets her know that he enjoyed talking with her. He really liked meeting her. And he says, It was nice to meet you."
Sadia: Nice guy!
Keith: What's next?
Sadia: Next is, "Same here."
Keith: "same here."
Sadia: Yes-- When Zo says, "It was nice to meet you," Michelle responds by saying, "Same here."
Keith: So, "same here" simply means, “me too,” right?
Sadia: In other words, "things are the same where I'm standing-- I feel the same way." Same here. I really love this lesson.
Keith: Same here.
Sadia: [laughs]
Keith: Me too.
Sadia: Exactly.
Keith: This is actually very conversational
Sadia: Mm-hmm.
Keith: You can say, “Wow, I’m really hot in this room.
Sadia: I could say, “Ah, same here. Let’s go outside and get some air.”
Keith: Exactly.
Sadia: Next up, "By the way."
Keith: A great phrase. "By the way" is used to
introduce a new topic to the conversation.
Sadia: So in the dialogue, Zo wants to transition--he wants to move from saying good-bye to Michelle to giving her his business card.
Keith: Yeah. He says, "By the way, this is my business card."
Sadia: [laughs] He's a smooth operator-- he knows how to talk to the ladies!
Keith: [laughs]
Sadia: What's the next phrase, Keith?
Keith: The next phrase is, "I have a business card, too."
Sadia: That's right-- after Zo gives Micheller his business
card, she says, "I have a business card, too."
Keith: She does! And that's good news for Zo!
Sadia: It is good news for Zo because "I have a business
card, too" means, "I also have a business card."
Keith: "I have a business card, too." The word "too"-- spelled t-o-o-- means "also."
Sadia: Right. So Michelle says, “I have a business card, too” means “I have a business card also.”
Exactly. Finally, there's the phrase, "Here you are."
Keith: Ah, very, very useful. Say it when you're handing something to someone.
Sadia: . So if I were to say, "Can you hand me that book?" You would-- if you're nice-- say...
Keith: Here you are!

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus points of this lesson are possessive adjectives, The conjunction "and," the demonstrative "this," and informal imperatives.
Keith: Wow! That's a lot! You think we can tackle that?
Sadia: It sounds crazy, but it's, it’s all pretty easy. You'll see. First up, possessive adjectives.
Keith: So Zo says, "This is MY business card. This is MY e-mail address and this is MY phone number."
Sadia: He does. MY is a possessive adjective.
Keith: Why is that possessive?
Sadia: Possessive adjectives are words that are used with nouns to show ownership. Zo says, "This is MY business card. This is MY e-mail address and this is MY phone number."
Keith: "My" tells us that the business card, email address, and phone number all belong to Zo.
Sadia: Exactly. So, MY book, MY pen, MY glasses, MY desk. MY shows that all of those things belong to me.
Keith: What about HIS pen? HER book? Or THEIR desks?
Sadia: Of course. MY isn't the only possessive pronoun. The others are “your”, “his”, “her”, “its”, “our”, and their”. And you can find a little bit more about them in the lesson notes, and in future lessons.
Keith: What's next then?
Sadia: Next is the conjunction "and."
Keith: Ahh-- conjunctions. Isn't "and" used to link two words or phrases together?
Sadia: Right! Conjunctions are used to link
two words or phrases together!
Keith: In the dialogue, Zo says, "this is my email address
AND this is my phone number."
Sadia: Exactly. "And" is used to link "this is my email
address" to "this is my phone number."
Keith: What's next?
Sadia: Next is the demonstrative pronoun, "this." "This" refers to nouns that are nearby. In the dialogue, Zo says, " By the way, this is my business card. This is my email address, and this is my phone number."
Keith: He's showing his new friend Michelle his business card, which is nearby-- in his hand. And ON his business card are his email address and phone number.
Sadia: Right.
Keith: Well, we have one more thing to learn, and that’s informal imperative.
Sadia: Informal imperatives are casual commands you can give to a friend or anyone else you feel close to.
Keith: What's a "command?"
Sadia: Commands are sentences used to tell someone to do something.
Keith: So, an imperative IS a command.
Sadia: An imperative is a command, and an INFORMAL IMPERATIVE is a casual command you can say to someone you know.
Keith: Some examples of informal imperatives, or casual commands, are...
Sadia: Call me.Write me.
Keith: And in the dialogue, Michelle says to Zo, "Email me!" She is requesting that he email her.
Sadia: And now that they're friends, she uses an informal imperative.
Keith: OK, so how do you make an informal imperative?
Sadia: Well, informal imperatives are created by using the present tense of a verb and adding an objective pronoun-- in this case, "me."
Keith: For example, "take me."
Sadia: "Tell me."
Keith: "Follow me." Well, we have possessive adjectives, and that we’re talking about “my,” “his,” “her” “their” “our.” What else have we talked about?
Sadia: We talked about the conjunction "and," and you’ll remember that conjunctions are used to link two words or phrases. “And” is used to link two words or phrases. What else is there? Keith: We also talked about the demonstrative pronoun "this," and that’s talking about nouns that are close, that are near.
Sadia: Mm-hm. So this paper or this pen, or this book. Finally, we talked about informal imperatives. An imperative is a command. An informal imperative is a casual command, a command you give to someone you know.
Keith: For example, “Call me!” “Write me!”
Sadia: Exactly. It was a lot! But that wasn't so bad was it?
Keith: No, I don’t think so. It was pretty good I think.
Sadia: See? I don't lie, Keith. I don't lie...

4 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Welcome back to the Gengo series!

Gabriella - EnglishClass101.com
Thursday at 4:47 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Dear Haitham

Thank you for your question. To "fumble" means to use your hands in a clumsy way. In this situation, the person is trying to find his business card in a clumsy way that is making the other person laugh. "Grasping movements" refer to the gentleman finding his business card. Synonyms of "grasp" include "clutch" or "grab".

I hope this answers your questions and if you would like to ask anything else, please don't hesitate to ask!

Wishing you a great week!

Gabriella

Team EnglishClass101.com

Haitham
Tuesday at 9:27 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello again,

I can't understand when we said " Laughing at his fumbling" , another question " begins making those grasping movements again," what it dose mean? ,

thanks .

mehdia
Wednesday at 2:28 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

how you can learn english language