Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sadia: Hi, everyone. Sadia here.
Keith: Hey, and I’m Keith. Welcome to Gengo English Lesson 7 - “Don't Answer the English Questions Incorrectly!”
Sadia: In the last lesson, Lesson 6 - “Don't Miss Your Chance!
How to Close the Deal in English,” you learned how to
exchange personal information.
Keith: You also learned about possessive adjectives, such as, “my,” “his,” “her,” “its,” “ours.
Sadia: You learned about the conjunction, "and,"
Keith: the demonstrative, "this"
Sadia: And you learned about informal imperatives.
Keith: OK, so in this lesson you’re going to learn how to get
through immigration and customs.
Sadia: This conversation takes place at immigration in JFK
airport.
Keith: And the conversation is between the main character, Zo, and
an immigration official.
DIALOGUE
Customs Agent: Next. Passport, please.
Zo: Hello. Here you are.
Customs Agent: How long will you stay?
Zo: Once again, please.
Customs Agent: How long will you stay?
Zo: For 2 weeks.
Customs Agent: Where will you stay?
Zo: At the L Hotel.
Customs Agent: What’s the purpose of your stay?
Zo: Once again, please. Slowly please.
Customs Agent [annoyed but slowly]: What is the purpose of your stay?
Zo: I'm here on business, and to sightsee.
Customs Agent: Okay. Thank you. Welcome to the United States.
Keith: One more time slowly.
Customs Agent: Next. Passport, please.
Zo: Hello. Here you are.
Customs Agent: How long will you stay?
Zo: Once again, please.
Customs Agent: How long will you stay?
Zo: For 2 weeks.
Customs Agent: Where will you stay?
Zo: At the L Hotel.
Customs Agent: What’s the purpose of your stay?
Zo: Once again, please. Slowly please.
Customs Agent [annoyed but slowly]: What is the purpose of your stay?
Zo: I'm here on business, and to sightsee.
Customs Agent: Okay. Thank you. Welcome to the United States.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sadia: Okay. The most unloved part of travel-- passing
through customs.
Keith: Unloved? What do you mean by “unloved”?
Sadia: What I mean is that no one LIKES going through
customs! It is NOT loved.
Keith: Actually, every time I pass through customs, I get very, very nervous.
Sadia: Really?
Keith: Will they let me in? Will they let me in? Is there going to be a problem? And I think a lot of people experience that too. Well, you can see from the conversation that custom officials are pretty tough, like the one in our dialogue!
Sadia: Yeah, they’re all pretty tough. No small talk or polite
conversation!
Keith: Actually, what’s small talk?
Sadia: Small talk is... I guess it’s kind of short and sweet conversation. It’s very nice and it’s very pleasant and it’s very brief.
Keith: And with customs officials, definitely no small talk.
Sadia: No small talk. Why do you think that is?
Keith: They have to be really serious. I don’t know. First of all, there’s a lot of people waiting.
Sadia: Mm-hm.
Keith: And secondly, you know, they’re protecting their country.
Sadia: Exactly. So this customs official, the one in the dialogue, is NOT interested in
friendly conversation! He's what you call, "a man of few words!"
Keith: Ah, definitely right. Alright let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we shall see is...
Sadia: next [natural native speed]
Keith: immediately following, adjacent, future
Sadia: next [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: next [natural native speed]
Next:"
passport [natural native speed]
Keith: document needed to leave and re-enter a country
passport [slowly - broken down by syllable]
passport [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: how long [natural native speed]
Keith: for what length of time?
Sadia: how long [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: how long [natural native speed]
Next:"
to stay [natural native speed]
Keith: to remain somewhere
to stay [slowly - broken down by syllable]
to stay [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: for [natural native speed]
Keith: used as a function word to indicate purpose
Sadia: for [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: for [natural native speed]
Next:"
week [natural native speed]
Keith: unit of seven days
week [slowly - broken down by syllable]
week [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: purpose [natural native speed]
Keith: reason
Sadia: purpose [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: purpose [natural native speed]
Next:"
business [natural native speed]
Keith: activity of exchanging money by buying and selling
goods or services
business [slowly - broken down by syllable]
business [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: personal [natural native speed]
Keith: of or relating to a person
Sadia: personal [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: personal [natural native speed]
Next:"
Sadia: sightseeing [natural native speed]
Keith: the act of seeing sights
Sadia: sightseeing [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sadia: sightseeing [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: OK, so let’s take a look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sadia: The first phrase we’ll look at is, "How long will you stay?"
Keith: The customs official asks Zo, "How long will
you stay?" What does he mean by that?
Sadia: He'd like to know the length of time that Zo plans to
be in New York.
Keith: OK, so what's the next phrase?
Sadia: The next phrase is "for two weeks." When asked
how long he'll stay in New York, Zo answers, "for 2 weeks."
Keith: Right. And that's just short for, "for a two week period."
Sadia: Or, "for a two week length of time." A two-week stay.
Keith: What do we have next?
Sadia: The next phrase is, "Where will you stay?"
Keith: The customs official asks Zo, "Where will you stay?"
Sadia: Yes. And "Where will you stay?" means, "Where will you sleep and keep your belongings during your trip?"
Keith: The next phrase is, "I'm staying at The L Hotel."
Sadia: Oh, nice hotel!
Keith: Indeed. But what does "at" mean?
Sadia: "At" simply indicates where Zo will stay during his trip.
Keith: Exactly. "At" is a preposition meaning place where.
Sadia: So Zo is staying AT the L Hotel.
Keith: Next the customs official asks, "What is the purpose of your stay?"
Sadia: The customs official is simply asking why Zo has come to the United States. In response, Zo says, "I'm here on business and to sight see."
Keith: "On business and to sight see."
Sadia: There are a couple of important points in that phrase. First, "on business" and “to sight see.” First, “on business.” What's that mean?
Keith: "On business" just means. "for the purpose of business." Or “to do business.” What about the phrase, "to sight see?"
Sadia: "To sightsee" means, of course, to see the important sights in a place. I wonder where Zo will go sightseeing in New York.
Keith: If he’s in New York, he’s probably going to the Empire State Building.
Sadia: Mm-hmm.
Keith: Statue of Liberty.
Sadia: Right.
Keith: A lot of museums, but I guess we’ll have to wait and find out!
Sadia: I suppose so!

Lesson focus

Sadia: The focus points of this lesson are implied verbs and prepositions.
Keith: Okay. Well, let's start with implied verbs. I think a lot of people know what “verbs” mean, but what does “implied” mean?
Sadia: “Implied” means suggested or hinted at but NOT stated. So, the customs official says, "Passport please."
Keith: There he IMPLIES or suggests that he wants Zo to hand over his passport. Give me your passport.
Sadia: And Zo understands that this is what the official means, based on the situation.
Keith: Yeah, but why did he just say, "passport please?" and not a more friendly, informative phrase like, "Will you hand me your passport please?"
Sadia: Remember, there's no time to be polite! Both the customs official and Zo-- but especially the customs official-- wants to get the process over as quickly as possible.
Keith: Definitely true. So when the official asks Zo how long he'll stay
in New York, Zo says, "For two weeks." He didn’t say the full phrase, "I'm
staying for two weeks."
Sadia: And when the official asks where Zo is
staying, Zo says, "At The L Hotel."
Keith: Right. Again, the full phrase would be, "I'll stay at The L Hotel." But because he’s just using implied verbs, he’s just saying, “At the L Hotel.” .
Sadia: Also-- and finally-- when the customs
official asks Zo about the purpose of his stay--
Keith: Zo's reason for visiting New York--
Sadia: Yes-- Zo first responds by saying, "Once again,
please. Slowly, please."
Keith: Right. I don’t think there were any actual verbs in there, but what Zo means is, "Can you say that again? And can you say it slowly?"
Sadia: Precisely. So implied verbs-- or, suggested verbs--
don't appear in a sentence.
Keith: But you'll know what is meant based on the situation.
Sadia: So Zo knows exactly what the customs official means when he says, “Passport please.” And the customs official understands what Zo means when he says, “At the L Hotel.”
Keith: How about we move on to the second focus of this
lesson, which is prepositions.
Sadia: Okay. Prepositions link nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. Prepositions are everywhere!
Keith: It's very, very difficult to live your English-speaking life without prepositions
Sadia: Indeed-- so don't try it! What do prepositions do?
Keith: [SLOWLY] A preposition shows the relationship of its object to the rest of the sentence.
Sadia: OK, so, ON the table. OVER the moon. AGAINST my will. INTO the sunset.
Keith: You've got the idea. In this dialogue, Zo says he'll be in New York FOR two weeks.
Sadia: He’ll be IN New York FOR two weeks. And he says he's staying AT the L Hotel.
Keith: He also says, "I'm here ON business and TO sightsee."
Sadia: He likes his prepositions, this Zo!
Keith: [laughs] Well, everyone in English likes their prepositions. Actually, English learners probably don’t like prepositions.
Sadia: Mmm.. Yes, indeed.
Keith: But there are so many of them, you have to learn them.
Sadia: You have to learn them. So the prepositions in this dialogue, I think we heard-- FOR, AT, ON, TO-- they're not the only prepositions, are they?
Keith: They're not. Some of the most commonly used prepositions are "above," "after," "during," “but,” “by,” "in," "of," "on," "out," "up," "with." There’s so many more. So many more prepositions.
Sadia: Yeah, there a lot of prepositions, and these are words we hear all the time. I could say um, “I got a card FROM my friend.” Or maybe uh, “I’m going TO the park.” Or “My shoes are UNDER my bed.”
Keith: Right, there’s tons of them, but you can use them all the time and it’s very good for practice if you do.
Sadia: Yep. So we should all become very good friends with prepositions-- much like we hope Zo becomes very good friends WITH Michelle!
Keith: You got it.

14 Comments

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EnglishClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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TK
Thursday at 12:25 pm
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What do you mean by the word "islmplied"? It is a miswriting?

ALBERT KAZADI
Friday at 4:11 pm
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I didn't learn anything today, why?

What's the difference between "wake up" and "stand up"?

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 12:42 pm
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Hi Antonio,


Thank you for your kind feedback! Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,


Khanh

Team EnglishClass101.com

Antonio
Monday at 10:31 pm
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Nice lesson. Very useful in travels.

EnglishClass101.comVerified
Sunday at 8:55 am
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Hi Rodrigo,

@Istahil,


Thank you for posting!


In case of any questions, please feel free to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team EnglishClass101.com

Rodrigo
Sunday at 1:45 am
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Thank you so much for this lesson it is very true that immigration customs are pretty hard and we all get nervous when we are next to them

Istahil
Saturday at 3:02 pm
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Thank you so much lovely teacher love you and god bless you


Team EnglishClass101.com
Wednesday at 4:56 pm
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Hi Rodrigo,


First, in, on and at.

In describes something that is inside another object or space. For example:

"My phone is IN my pocket." The phone is inside the pocket.

"I live IN the USA." I live within the USA.


On has to do with the space above something. For example:

"There is a book ON the desk." The book is resting on top of the desk.

"He has a hat on his head." A hat is on top of a mans head.

However, when talking about phones, if you are making a phone call, you are 'on the phone.'


And at. At can answer the question "where is it?" It describes location, similar to a position on a grid or chart.

For example:

"Where is the store?" "The store is at the corner of Central and fourth street."

"Where is Mike?" "He is at the park."


Ok, now let's look at "I really don't know," and "I don't really know." The sentences are different. To explain this, let's remove one word from each sentence and see what happens afterward.

"I really don't know." Let's remove really from the sentence.

"I don't know." These two sentences almost mean the same thing. In this case, really is expressing the honesty of the statement. It emphasizes and attaches to 'don't.'


"I don't really know." This time, we will remove the word 'don't.'

"I really know." This sentence mean that I know, or I know [it] very well.

When we add the word don't, it reverses the meaning. It becomes "I only know a little."


These were great questions!


Keep studying!

Adam


Team EnglishClass101.com

Rodrigo Farias
Tuesday at 9:12 pm
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By the way, is it correct to write "I really don't know" or the sentence only admits "I don't really know"?

Rodrigo Farias
Tuesday at 9:10 pm
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I really don't know when to use correctly the prepositions "in", "on" and "at". They seem to me interchangeable, so, I make a lot of mistakes.