Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Ryan: I’m Ryan.
Chihiro: Hey, everyone! I’m Chihiro. And thanks again for being here with us. Giving Directions in English.
Ryan: In this lesson, you'll will learn how to give directions.
Chihiro: This conversation takes place just outside the office.
Ryan: The conversation is between Sandra and Teddy.
Chihiro: The speakers are friends, so they'll be speaking casually.
Ryan: Alright, let’s have a listen.

Lesson conversation

Sandra: So, where's your friend's house?
Teddy: Go South on 101 and take the Reed exit. Drive down Reed Street and make a left onto Fifth Street. It's on the corner of Fifth and San Carlos. It's the small white house with the blue windows. It has a gnome in the front yard. You can't miss it.
Sandra: Oh, I think I've seen it. The gnome is quite eye-catching. Your friend is an art student, right?
Teddy: Was…she just graduated in May. When you see her place, you can definitely tell she's an art student.
Sandra: Its got a look to it?
Teddy: Yeah, definitely. She's got paintings by all these famous artists. I don't know half of the painters, but I know they're definitely famous.
Sandra: Oh yeah?
Teddy: Yeah, I was there just yesterday. She had one of a bunch of Campbell's soup and was trying to decide where to put it.
Sandra: Oh yeah, I know that one. That would make me hungry all the time if I had it up on my wall!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Sandra: So, where's your friend's house?
Teddy: Go South on 101 and take the Reed exit. Drive down Reed Street and make a left onto Fifth Street. It's on the corner of Fifth and San Carlos. It's the small white house with the blue windows. It has a gnome in the front yard. You can't miss it.
Sandra: Oh, I think I've seen it. The gnome is quite eye-catching. Your friend is an art student, right?
Teddy: Was…she just graduated in May. When you see her place, you can definitely tell she's an art student.
Sandra: Its got a look to it?
Teddy: Yeah, definitely. She's got paintings by all these famous artists. I don't know half of the painters, but I know they're definitely famous.
Sandra: Oh yeah?
Teddy: Yeah, I was there just yesterday. She had one of a bunch of Campbell's soup and was trying to decide where to put it.
Sandra: Oh yeah, I know that one. That would make me hungry all the time if I had it up on my wall!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chihiro: Okay, now thanks to technology, we don't have to ask for directions to many places as much as we used to.
Ryan: Yeah, getting to places is a lot easier these days than they used to.
Chihiro: This doesn't mean that you can't ask for directions anymore, of course. But it's common to just type in an address on a personal GPS navigation device either in your car or on your phone if you have one, or you can print them out off the Internet.
Ryan: Chihiro, do you ever ask for directions?
Chihiro: I actually still do, although my phone does has GPS, I still think it's easier to ask somebody really quickly and get a response, then trying to figure it out by myself.
Ryan: Yes, that's true, sometimes it's just easier to ask. That's when knowing how to say and give directions is useful.
VOCAB LIST
Ryan: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Chihiro: south [natural native speed]
Ryan: direction opposite of north
Chihiro: south [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: south [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: exit [natural native speed]
Ryan: leading road off the highway
Chihiro: exit [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: exit [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: gnome [natural native speed]
Ryan: statue of a creature that guards treasures in stories usually placed in a garden for decoration
Chihiro: gnome [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: gnome [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: yard [natural native speed]
Ryan: outdoor area next to a house
Chihiro: yard [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: yard [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: to graduate [natural native speed]
Ryan: to earn a degree from a school
Chihiro: to graduate [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: to graduate [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: look [natural native speed]
Ryan: appearance or characteristic of something
Chihiro: look [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: look [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: bunch [natural native speed]
Ryan: similar things grouped together
Chihiro: bunch [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: bunch [natural native speed]
: Next:
Chihiro: Campbell's [natural native speed]
Ryan: name of brand that also makes canned soup
Chihiro: Campbell's [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Chihiro: Campbell's [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Ryan: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the phrases from this lesson.
Chihiro: The first phrase is,
Ryan: "you can't miss it."
Chihiro: We use it when the person has never seen the thing being described, and it also reassures the person that it is very easy to find.
Ryan: Right, so if I say, “The building is blue with yellow polk-a-dots, you can’t miss it,” then that means the building stands out enough so you will know it right away.
Chihiro: That would be an interesting looking building. Okay, the next phrase we'll look at is,
Ryan: "Eye catching"
Chihiro: Sandra mentions that the gnome is quite "eye-catching." What this means is that the gnome draws attention. We often use this phrase for things that are attractive and therefore draws the eye of a person.
Ryan: Right, so the blue building with yellow polk-a-dots is impossible to miss because it's eye-catching.
Chihiro: Yes. That would definitely be an eye-cathing building.

Lesson focus

Chihiro: The focus of this lesson is giving directions. When giving directions, we use the imperative form. However, this doesn't mean that the speech sounds commanding or rude. Even if a stranger asked you on the street, you can reply in this form.
Ryan: There are several ways to say the same thing so be prepared for a variety.
Chihiro: Let's start with something simple. We can say,
Ryan: "Drive down"
Chihiro: or
Ryan: "Drive up"
Chihiro: or
Ryan: "Go straight"
Chihiro: To mean the same thing. Except the first two are used for drivers only. The third one can be used for both.
Ryan: Okay, the next one is
Chihiro: "Turn left"
Ryan: or
Chihiro: "turn right"
Ryan: Which can also be said as,
Chihiro: "make a left" "make a right"
Ryan: You can use those for drivers and walkers. Now if somebody says,
Chihiro: "It's on your left"
Ryan: With the preposition "on", this doesn't mean to turn, but whatever you're looking for is located left.
Chihiro: A little preposition difference goes a long way. Okay, and the next ones you can use only for drivers.
Ryan: "Take the first exit"
Chihiro: Or of course you can substitute the first with second or next or third or whatever number. You probably don't use higher numbers too much though.
Ryan: No, although I guess you could!
Chihiro: True.
Ryan: Here's another one you might hear,
Chihiro: "Until you see..."
Ryan: as in,
Chihiro: "Until you see a gas station"
Ryan: And the rest are pretty common.
Chihiro: "On the corner"
Ryan: "Across the street from"
Chihiro: "Next to"
Ryan: You've probably heard of those when learning your prepositions.
Chihiro: Okay. let's take a look at some of these phrases in a sentence, it'll be much easier to see how they work this way. You can see how Teddy uses several of these phrases when giving directions to Sandra. He says,
Ryan: “Go South on 101 and take the Reed exit. Drive down Reed Street and make a left onto Fifth Street. It's on the corner of Fifth and San Carlos.”
Chihiro: Those are very clear driving directions. Okay, Ryan, let's give an example of how pedestrians might be talking.
Ryan: Sure, if I say, "Excuse me, do you know where the post office is?"
Chihiro: "Sure, go straight down this street until you see the lights. Make a right onto the main street and walk straight down toward the park. It's past the library on the left side."
Ryan: "Okay so that was straight down the street until the lights, get onto the main street and walk toward the park... and then...”
Chihiro: “Pass the library on the left side, and you'll see it on your right."
Ryan: Past the library on the left and it's on my right. Got it.
Chihiro: You can use your hands and point in the right direction. If you ask somebody, try repeating the directions the person says so that you know for sure that you understand. If somebody asks you, you might have to repeat the directions to clarify.
Ryan: Especially if they're long directions.
Chihiro: Okay, I think that's enough directions for today!

Outro

Ryan: That just about does it for today. See you guys soon!
Chihiro: See you all later!

45 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:39 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Francisco,


Thanks for getting in touch. 😄


The phrase "It's got a look to it" means it has a particular appearance/ with typical features. In this case, it means that the woman's home looks like a typical artists home.


If you would like further assistance, I suggest upgrading to our ‘Premium Plus’ membership to get personal instructions from one of our English teachers through our ‘MyTeacher’ feature! (Link: www.englishclass101.com/myteacher)


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Francisco
Thursday at 12:35 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi

I'm not sure what does this question means: "Its got a look to it?" Can you explain me please?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 07:24 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Yen,


Thanks for getting in touch.


The phrase "it's got a look to it..." means 'it has a certain appearance.'


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 07:21 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello sina,


Yes, it is the name of a highway or motorway.


If you ever have any more questions, please let us know! 😉


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Yen
Saturday at 10:04 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Team,


It is a nice lesson.

Could you guys explain the meaning of the sentence "Its got a look to it", please?


Thanks,

Yen

sina
Wednesday at 10:27 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi

is 101 in dialogue name of a street?



thank you for answering.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 04:28 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi there Az Ho,


Thank you for posting! We hope you're enjoying your studies with us.


Feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Cheers,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Az Ho
Wednesday at 11:51 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 03:38 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi there Arturo,


Thanks for taking the time to write to us! 😄


The sentence you mentioned is correct. 👍


Please let us know if you ever have any questions throughout your studies, we would be happy to assist.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Arturo Aguilar
Thursday at 11:23 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

"Yeah, I was JUST there yesterday. She had one PAINTING of a bunch of Campbell's soup and was trying to decide where to put it."

please correct