Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Ryan: Ryan here! Which Aisle is the Canned Soup?
Chihiro: Hey, everybody! I’m Chihiro. In this lesson, you'll will learn how to ask where products are at the supermarket.
Ryan: This conversation takes place at the supermarket.
Chihiro: The conversation is between Sandra and Teddy.
Ryan: And, the speakers will be speaking casually.

Lesson conversation

Teddy: Excuse me, where can I find canned soup?
Supermarket Lady: Down aisle two, on your left-hand side.
Teddy: Okay, thanks.
Sandra: You want to feed our sick friend canned soup?
Teddy: Hey, that stuff is good! Campbell's chicken noodle soup is nothing to be ashamed of!
Sandra: No, Drew is not going to get better off that instant stuff. I'm going to make him some homemade soup. Excuse me, where's the soup stock?
Supermarket Lady: That'll be down the sixth aisle, across from the sauces.
Sandra: Okay, thanks… Hey, speaking of canned soup, how's your friend Alex? Nice lady, kind of strange, but nice.
Teddy: I think she's good. I heard the cops visited her place a few days later…maybe we were too loud at the party? But I haven't heard from her since.
Sandra: Hmm…strange they came after the whole thing was over. Oh well, not my place.
Teddy: Yeah, oh well, I'm sure she handled the situation. Anyway, if you're going to make the soup, I'll buy the crackers.
Sandra: How very thoughtful of you. Well, since I'm making it, I might as well make some for you, my kids, and my husband all in one go.
Teddy: That's the spirit, Sandra!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Teddy: Excuse me, where can I find canned soup?
Supermarket Lady: Down aisle two, on your left-hand side.
Teddy: Okay, thanks.
Sandra: You want to feed our sick friend canned soup?
Teddy: Hey, that stuff is good! Campbell's chicken noodle soup is nothing to be ashamed of!
Sandra: No, Drew is not going to get better off that instant stuff. I'm going to make him some homemade soup. Excuse me, where's the soup stock?
Supermarket Lady: That'll be down the sixth aisle, across from the sauces.
Sandra: Okay, thanks… Hey, speaking of canned soup, how's your friend Alex? Nice lady, kind of strange, but nice.
Teddy: I think she's good. I heard the cops visited her place a few days later…maybe we were too loud at the party? But I haven't heard from her since.
Sandra: Hmm…strange they came after the whole thing was over. Oh well, not my place.
Teddy: Yeah, oh well, I'm sure she handled the situation. Anyway, if you're going to make the soup, I'll buy the crackers.
Sandra: How very thoughtful of you. Well, since I'm making it, I might as well make some for you, my kids, and my husband all in one go.
Teddy: That's the spirit, Sandra!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ryan: Have you ever been to a supermarket and you just can't find the things you're looking for, and you walk up and down those aisles?
Chihiro: Yeah, and in the end it's in a place where you never would have thought.
Ryan: Yeah, you think to yourself that you should've just asked a sales rep, but for some reason you just wanted to find it yourself right?
Chihiro: Yeah, something like that! Listeners, supermarkets in the United States are generally big and can have many aisles lined up with a lot of groceries.
Ryan: There's usually a sign hanging above every aisle so that the customer knows where to find certain types of products.
Chihiro: Some major supermarkets have self-checkout machines where you can pay without a cashier, and some places have registers where customers buying only a certain number of items can check out more quickly.
Ryan: Yeah, those self-checkout machines are great if you're in a line with people who know how to use it. Not so great if you're in a line with people who don't know how to use it!
Chihiro: Yeah, but you know what? Maybe in the future, more and more checkouts will be computers, maybe only computers. What do you think listeners?
VOCAB LIST
Chihiro: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Ryan: aisle [natural native speed]
Chihiro: narrow and long space where people can walk
Ryan: aisle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: aisle [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: to feed [natural native speed]
Chihiro: to give food to
Ryan: to feed [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: to feed [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: ashamed [natural native speed]
Chihiro: feeling guilt and bad about something
Ryan: ashamed [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: ashamed [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: instant [natural native speed]
Chihiro: happening in a very short period of time
Ryan: instant [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: instant [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: homemade [natural native speed]
Chihiro: made at home
Ryan: homemade [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: homemade [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: cop [natural native speed]
Chihiro: informal for police officer
Ryan: cop [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: cop [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: to handle [natural native speed]
Chihiro: to manage successfully
Ryan: to handle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: to handle [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: all in one go [natural native speed]
Chihiro: all at the same time
Ryan: all in one go [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: all in one go [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: spirit [natural native speed]
Chihiro: force in a person believed to give the person power and energy
Ryan: spirit [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: spirit [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Chihiro: Let’s take a closer look at the usage for some of the phrases from this lesson.
Ryan: The first phrase is,
Chihiro: "handle the situation."
Ryan: This means "to be able to react and respond properly to a problem." If you handle a situation well, that means you can solve the problem smoothly.
Chihiro: One the other hand, if the phrase is in the negative as in you don't handle it well, then it means that something went very wrong because you couldn’t control the situation. Okay. What’s the next phrase?
Ryan: "might as well."
Chihiro: In this case, Sandra uses the phrase to mean that she will make the soup for more people while she's at it. In other words, since she's making it, she should make more. Why not?
Ryan: So, let's go onto the grammar point?
Chihiro: Right, since we're finished here, might as well.

Lesson focus

Chihiro: The Focus of This Lesson Is the Difference between the Two Future Tenses, "Going to" and "Will."
Ryan: Okay, listeners, many of you may have heard of both of these future forms. And it might not be the first time you've wondered about when to use what.
Chihiro: "Will" and "going to" are both future tense forms. We can use them interchangeably sometimes, yet they have a difference in meaning. The difference in meaning could set the feeling of the entire sentence.
Ryan: In many cases, the form using "going to" talks about plans, decisions, or intentions. The "will" form conveys a voluntary action, or a will. Let's take a look at some sentences.
Chihiro: Teddy uses the "going to" future form when he says
Ryan: "if you're going to make the soup"
Chihiro: Because he's talking about Sandra's plan of making the soup. The making of the soup is her plan which is an activity that is scheduled for her.
Ryan: In the next sentence, he uses the "will" form for the sentence
Chihiro: "I'll buy the crackers."
Ryan: Here, he switches tothe other form because he is voluntarily saying that he wants to do something. In this case, he's expressing his desire to buy crackers or rather the desire to help.
Chihiro: If you can understand the difference between these two future tenses and can use them accordingly, you'll be able to get your meaning across more clearly. Take, for example,
Ryan: "I'm going to do the dishes."
Chihiro: Here, Ryan is saying that he's washing the dishes in the future. He's telling us his intention of the action and is doing them because he needs to. Now if he says,
Ryan: "I'll do the dishes."
Chihiro: Again, he's saying that he is washing the dishes in the future. However, this time, what's different from the previous sentence is that he's telling the listener his desire to do the dishes. Therefore, the second one expresses a voluntary action, a show perhaps that he wants to help. Now, if you were to help somebody with the cleaning, which would you most likely say?
Ryan: The nuance may be hard to understand at first, but like all English phrases, listen for them and you'll see how people use the two forms in different situations.
Chihiro: Also know that the "will" form is used more often in formal situations, as well as in writing.
Ryan: Okay, we're going to finish the grammar point now.
Chihiro: Yes, and we know you will give both of these future forms a try.

Outro

Chihiro: That just about does it for today. We’ll see you all soon.
Ryan: Bye for now.

30 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:03 PM
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Hello Francisco,


Oh dear! I hope Alex didn't steal a painting from the museum!


If you would like further assistance, I suggest upgrading to our ‘Premium Plus’ membership to get personal instructions from one of our English teachers through our ‘MyTeacher’ feature!www.englishclass101.com/myteacher


Kindly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Francisco
Tuesday at 05:01 AM
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Hey

Looks like Alex might be who stole the paint from the museum :O

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 10:46 AM
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Hi there Az Ho,


Thank you!


Please feel free to shoot through any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Az Ho
Friday at 10:12 AM
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❤️️❤️️❤️️❤️️

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 04:38 PM
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Hello Guy,


Thank you for taking the time to leave us your kind words. 😇

If you ever have any questions, please let us know.


Best,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Guy
Saturday at 07:20 PM
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Hello

Thanks for this lesson .When I was in the big store in US I was always lost !! It was very difficult to ask where are the products ..?

Thanks for your help and I like your learning method because we are in the real life

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 05:14 PM
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Hi Mukti,


You're welcome. 😇

If you ever have any questions, please let us know.


Best,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Mukti Prakash Datta
Tuesday at 07:12 AM
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Thanks , May 4, 2020👍

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:32 PM
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Hello Mojgan,


Thanks for the great question.


"That's the spirit" is an expression used when someone is showing a lot of enthusiasm. It is a form of encouragement or phrase. For example, someone falls off their bike in a bike race but gets back on and continues the race - someone might say "That's the spirit! Keep up the great work!"


I hope this is helpful to you.


Cheers,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hello there @João,


Thank you for letting us know.


We will have a look into this asap.


Many thanks,

Eva

Team EnglishClass101.com