Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Ryan: Hi, my name is Ryan and I’m joined here by Chihiro.
Chihiro: Hey, everybody! And welcome back to EnglishClass101.com. What's the First Thing to Ask in English When You Check into a Hotel?
Ryan: So what are we gonna learn today?
Chihiro: In this lesson, you’ll learn about hotel language.
Ryan: This conversation takes place at the front desk of a hotel.
Chihiro: The conversation is between Drew and the receptionist.
Ryan: The receptionist will be speaking formally and Drew will be speaking casually.
Chihiro: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Receptionist: Welcome to the Golden Gate Hotel. Do you have a reservation, sir?
Drew: Yes, I do.
Receptionist: May I have your name, sir?
Drew: Drew English.
Receptionist: …Okay, sir, looks like you have a double room for seven nights. You'll be staying in room 706 on the seventh floor. The gym and pool are on the tenth floor, and breakfast starts at five-thirty in the morning and closes at ten. Here's your room key.
Drew: Is there a minibar in the room?
Receptionist: Yes, there is, sir, but if you do take anything from there, it looks like expenses from that will not be covered by Innovative International.
Drew: I knew I was hoping in vain…oh well, at least there is one.
Receptionist: Anything else, sir?
Drew: Yeah, can I get the number to a car rental service around here?
Receptionist: You can find that information in a pamphlet in your room.
Drew: All right. Thanks.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Receptionist: Welcome to the Golden Gate Hotel. Do you have a reservation, sir?
Drew: Yes, I do.
Receptionist: May I have your name, sir?
Drew: Drew English.
Receptionist: …Okay, sir, looks like you have a double room for seven nights. You'll be staying in room 706 on the seventh floor. The gym and pool are on the tenth floor, and breakfast starts at five-thirty in the morning and closes at ten. Here's your room key.
Drew: Is there a minibar in the room?
Receptionist: Yes, there is, sir, but if you do take anything from there, it looks like expenses from that will not be covered by Innovative International.
Drew: I knew I was hoping in vain…oh well, at least there is one.
Receptionist: Anything else, sir?
Drew: Yeah, can I get the number to a car rental service around here?
Receptionist: You can find that information in a pamphlet in your room.
Drew: All right. Thanks.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chihiro: Sounds like Innovative International knew what Drew is all about!
Ryan: Yeah, if the company paid for the mini bar at the hotel I were staying at, I would have a party there!
Chihiro: Yep and I'll show up for sure!
Ryan: Yeah, they might not allow you on the tab though!
Chihiro: Anyways... let's talk about the hotels in the States. If you've ever booked a hotel, you might have come across different names for different rooms.
Ryan: Right, for example, Drew has a double room, which means a room that has one big bed, either a king size or queen size, that fits two adults.
Chihiro: And a single room, is a room with a single bed that fits only one adult. A twin is a room with two separate single beds.
Ryan: Other rooms such as a triple also exist; a triple means the room either has one large bed and a single bed or three single beds.
Chihiro: Rooms can have minibars so that the guest can take a snack or a drink that he or she must pay for later. It’s usually charged to the room.
VOCAB LIST
Chihiro: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Ryan: reservation [natural native speed]
Chihiro: an arrangement to have something (like a hotel room) held for one's use
Ryan: reservation [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: reservation [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: double room [natural native speed]
Chihiro: hotel room with two double-sized beds
Ryan: double room [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: double room [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: gym [natural native speed]
Chihiro: a place equipped with machines and other tools for exercising
Ryan: gym [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: gym [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: pool [natural native speed]
Chihiro: swimming pool, a small body of water contained for swimming
Ryan: pool [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: pool [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: minibar [natural native speed]
Chihiro: small refrigerator in a hotel room with drinks for sale
Ryan: minibar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: minibar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: expense [natural native speed]
Chihiro: amount of money that must be paid
Ryan: expense [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: expense [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: to cover [natural native speed]
Chihiro: to pay for something
Ryan: to cover [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: to cover [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: in vain [natural native speed]
Chihiro: without success
Ryan: in vain [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: in vain [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ryan: pamphlet [natural native speed]
Chihiro: small thin book with no cover with information about a topic
Ryan: pamphlet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ryan: pamphlet [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Chihiro: Let’s take a closer look at some of the phrases from this lesson.
Ryan: The first phrase is, "it looks like..." We use this when the speaker is making a conclusion based on something he or she perceives. It also allows the speaker to step away from the responsibility of the situation, as though to be the messenger and not the cause.
Chihiro: In the dialogue, the receptionist says,
Ryan: "looks like you have a double room for seven nights"
Chihiro: and
Ryan: "it looks like expenses from that will not be covered by Innovative International."
Chihiro: Both these times she is acting as the messenger with the information she sees on her computer and she’s not taking responsibility for the actual statement. So use it next time you're just the messenger with no responsibility!!
Ryan: Haha, good advice. Now the next phrase is “in vain". This means to do something without success. Drew says, Chihiro
Ryan: Meaning that he was hoping for something knowing that it wouldn't be possible.
Chihiro: Yes, you'll hear this one from time to time. Okay, let’s go on to the grammar point for this lesson.

Lesson focus

Chihiro: The focus of this lesson is the first conditional. When talking about true or possible situations, in the future, we usually use the word "if" with the present tense and we use the future tense in the second part. So, for example,
Ryan: "If you do take anything from there, expenses will not be covered by Innovative International."
Chihiro: The receptionist is saying that she knows Drew may or may not take a drink from the minibar. When he does, he is going to pay for the drink and not Innovative International.
Ryan: In other words, the second part of the "if" statement with the future tense describes the consequence in the event that the "if" statement happens.
Chihiro: We use this when we think that the "if" statement is very likely to happen.
Ryan: Therefore instead of being a hypothetical statement, it's a cause and effect or action and consequence statement.
Chihiro: Okay, here are some examples,
Ryan: "If he rides his bike, he will arrive faster."
Chihiro: Ryan here is saying that the person will surely arrive faster when the person rides his bike.
Ryan: "If you stop by the office, you can pick up the documents."
Chihiro: It's possible for the person to collect the documents, in the event of the person going to the office.
Ryan: "She's going to take the train if the bus is late."
Chihiro: Again, in the case of the bus coming, she won't ride the train.
Ryan: You can put the "if" in the second part of the sentence if you'd like as in the last example.
Chihiro: Now, remember how in the first lesson, we learned the second conditional? This conditional is different in that the "if" statement is more likely to happen than the second conditional.
Ryan: Right. So that's why the present tense is used, and not the past tense.
Chihiro: Compare these two sentences
Ryan: “If I have a party, I will invite 100 people.”
Chihiro: And,
Ryan: “If I were to have a party, I would invite 100 people.”
Chihiro: In this case, we know that Ryan is really thinking about throwing a party in the first statement, as opposed to thinking about it without much intention of making it real in the second statement.
Ryan: Or if Chihiro says
Chihiro: “If I win the lottery, I will take a year off.”
Ryan: as opposed to
Chihiro: “If I won the lottery, I would take a year off”.
Ryan: We know that she's being more positive and that she's feeling lucky in the first statement using the first conditional as opposed to the second statement. That's the difference between the first and the second conditional.
Chihiro: Okay, try and use this construction when you talk about the consequences as in the dialogue. Remember, that the "if" statement may or may not happen, and if it does, then the sentence in the future tense will happen.
Ryan: Keep in mind that the "if" statement action is something with a good possibility of happening as well.
Chihiro: You'll hear this construction all the time, so keep your ears open for them.

Outro

Chihiro: That just about does it for today.
Ryan: Bye for now!
Chihiro: Bye, everyone!

112 Comments

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EnglishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 08:15 PM
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Hello Daniel,


Yes, you can take out the word 'do' and it would have the same meaning.


I hope you're enjoying your studies with us.


Regards,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Daniel
Thursday at 08:38 PM
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HI everyone


Grammar question! Talking about the phrase "If you do take anything from there...", in my mind, this idea is like: "If you take anything from there..." without word "do". Are both correct?


Thanks in advance.

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:50 PM
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Hello Gary,


Thanks for sharing your English language skills.


It's great to have you on board.


Please feel free to ask us any questions you have throughout your studies.


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Gary
Monday at 11:14 AM
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A: Welcome to the Golden Gate Hotel. Do you have a reservation, sir?

B: Yes, I do.

A: May I have your name, sir?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:43 AM
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Hello Hiroshi,


Thank you for your message.


In the dialogue, the customer asked "Is there a minibar in there?" which the receptionist replied, "If you do take anything from there, it looks like expenses from that will not be covered by Innovative International." This means that if the customer was to take a bottle of wine or chocolate or anything from the minibar fridge, they would have to pay for it, their company wouldn't be paying for it.


I hope this is helpful to you. 😄👍


Sincerely,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Hiroshi
Monday at 11:01 AM
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Hello Teachers


I have a question.


Firstly, I couldn't understand meaning of the sentence "if you do take anything from there, it looks like expenses from that will not be covered by Innovative International.". I took a look at previous lesson, and found Drew was Innovative International company's employee. So, my understanding is that cost of anything in the minibar is higher than the pay cast that Innovative International permits. is this correct?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:19 PM
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Hello Yasu,


You're very welcome. Thanks for your question.


"In vain..." is a phrase that means 'without success.'

Part of this dialogue could be a soliloquy, for example the part that says, "Oh well, at least there is one..." highlights the speakers inner thoughts.


Happy to answer any questions you have. 😄


Truly,

Éva

Team EnglishClass101.com

Yasu
Saturday at 12:11 PM
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Hello

Thank you for the lesson.

I have a question.


Drew says "I knew I was hoping in vain…oh well, at least there is one"

Is it his soliloquy?

EnglishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:35 AM
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Hello Charvi,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

Levente

Team EnglishClass101.com

Charvi
Wednesday at 07:29 PM
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Thanks for this marvelous lesson! :)